The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Intrinsic Lévy behaviour in organisms – searching for a mechanism: Comment on “Liberating Lévy walk research from the shackles of optimal foraging” by A.M. Reynolds

Intrinsic Lévy behaviour in organisms – searching for a mechanism: Comment on “Liberating Lévy walk research from the shackles of optimal foraging” by A.M. Reynolds
Intrinsic Lévy behaviour in organisms – searching for a mechanism: Comment on “Liberating Lévy walk research from the shackles of optimal foraging” by A.M. Reynolds
The seminal papers by Viswanathan and colleagues in the late 1990s [1] and [2] proposed not only that scale-free, superdiffusive Lévy walks can describe the free-ranging movement patterns observed in animals such as the albatross [1], but that the Lévy walk was optimal for searching for sparsely and randomly distributed resource targets [2]. This distinct advantage, now shown to be present over a much broader set of conditions than originally theorised [3], implied that the Lévy walk is a search strategy that should be found very widely in organisms [4]. In the years since there have been several influential empirical studies showing that Lévy walks can indeed be detected in the movement patterns of a very broad range of taxa, from jellyfish, insects, fish, reptiles, seabirds, humans [5], [6], [7], [8], [9] and [10], and even in the fossilised trails of extinct invertebrates [11]. The broad optimality and apparent deep evolutionary origin of movement (search) patterns that are well approximated by Lévy walks led to the development of the Lévy flight foraging (LFF) hypothesis [12], which states that “since Lévy flights and walks can optimize search efficiencies, therefore natural selection should have led to adaptations for Lévy flight foraging”.
Lévy walks, Lévy flights, Anomalous diffusion, Movement ecology, Neurobiology, Foraging, Scale-free, Power laws
1571-0645
111-114
Sims, David W.
7234b444-25e2-4bd5-8348-a1c142d0cf81
Sims, David W.
7234b444-25e2-4bd5-8348-a1c142d0cf81

Sims, David W. (2015) Intrinsic Lévy behaviour in organisms – searching for a mechanism: Comment on “Liberating Lévy walk research from the shackles of optimal foraging” by A.M. Reynolds. Physics of Life Reviews, 14, 111-114. (doi:10.1016/j.plrev.2015.06.002).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The seminal papers by Viswanathan and colleagues in the late 1990s [1] and [2] proposed not only that scale-free, superdiffusive Lévy walks can describe the free-ranging movement patterns observed in animals such as the albatross [1], but that the Lévy walk was optimal for searching for sparsely and randomly distributed resource targets [2]. This distinct advantage, now shown to be present over a much broader set of conditions than originally theorised [3], implied that the Lévy walk is a search strategy that should be found very widely in organisms [4]. In the years since there have been several influential empirical studies showing that Lévy walks can indeed be detected in the movement patterns of a very broad range of taxa, from jellyfish, insects, fish, reptiles, seabirds, humans [5], [6], [7], [8], [9] and [10], and even in the fossilised trails of extinct invertebrates [11]. The broad optimality and apparent deep evolutionary origin of movement (search) patterns that are well approximated by Lévy walks led to the development of the Lévy flight foraging (LFF) hypothesis [12], which states that “since Lévy flights and walks can optimize search efficiencies, therefore natural selection should have led to adaptations for Lévy flight foraging”.

Text
Sims_Intrinsic.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
Download (231kB)

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 12 June 2015
Published date: September 2015
Keywords: Lévy walks, Lévy flights, Anomalous diffusion, Movement ecology, Neurobiology, Foraging, Scale-free, Power laws
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 378079
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/378079
ISSN: 1571-0645
PURE UUID: 5704f27a-eafc-4813-8e78-4a31a933f2c6

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Jun 2015 09:34
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 06:58

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×