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Using atmospheric model output to simulate the meteorological tsunami response to Tropical Storm Helene (2000)

Using atmospheric model output to simulate the meteorological tsunami response to Tropical Storm Helene (2000)
Using atmospheric model output to simulate the meteorological tsunami response to Tropical Storm Helene (2000)
[1] In the fall of both 1999 and 2000, unexpected “rapid tides” occurred along the coast of the Avalon Peninsula of Newfoundland. These rapid tides have been linked to the passing of Tropical Storm Jose (1999) and Tropical Storm Helene (2000) over the Grand Banks. Here we examine the dynamic ocean response to Tropical Storm Helene (2000) using a barotropic shallow water ocean model forced by atmospheric pressure and surface winds derived from a simulation of Helene using a dynamical model of the atmosphere. The ocean model is able to capture the main features of the observed response at the coast of Newfoundland as seen in the available tide gauge data. Results show that the simulated sea level response at the coast is driven by a combination of wind stress and atmospheric pressure forcing, the former generally dominating. An exception is Conception Bay, Newfoundland, where the response is captured mainly by atmospheric pressure forcing. Offshore near the edge of the Grand Banks, atmospheric pressure and wind stress forcing are equally important. The wind-forced response depends on the divergence of the surface wind stress and hence on the structure of the storm in the atmospheric model simulation. Sensitivity studies show the importance of having a small time interval (on the order of minutes) at which the atmospheric forcing is supplied to the ocean model and show the importance of the location of the storm track.
tropical storm, ocean modeling, meteorological tsunami
0148-0227
C10005
Mecking, J.V.
9b090069-5061-4340-b736-9690894ce203
Fogarty, C.T.
5e0f7384-d3a5-4c2f-b8ca-ac2554c17329
Greatbatch, R.J.
796e3a1c-20da-474b-bdef-a339f58dd7a1
Sheng, J.
951f0e99-3ad5-472f-a778-90ba21423b01
Mercer, D.
23909c6b-d78b-4890-a759-2a50c4239c18
Mecking, J.V.
9b090069-5061-4340-b736-9690894ce203
Fogarty, C.T.
5e0f7384-d3a5-4c2f-b8ca-ac2554c17329
Greatbatch, R.J.
796e3a1c-20da-474b-bdef-a339f58dd7a1
Sheng, J.
951f0e99-3ad5-472f-a778-90ba21423b01
Mercer, D.
23909c6b-d78b-4890-a759-2a50c4239c18

Mecking, J.V., Fogarty, C.T., Greatbatch, R.J., Sheng, J. and Mercer, D. (2009) Using atmospheric model output to simulate the meteorological tsunami response to Tropical Storm Helene (2000). Journal of Geophysical Research, 114 (C10), C10005. (doi:10.1029/2009JC005290).

Record type: Article

Abstract

[1] In the fall of both 1999 and 2000, unexpected “rapid tides” occurred along the coast of the Avalon Peninsula of Newfoundland. These rapid tides have been linked to the passing of Tropical Storm Jose (1999) and Tropical Storm Helene (2000) over the Grand Banks. Here we examine the dynamic ocean response to Tropical Storm Helene (2000) using a barotropic shallow water ocean model forced by atmospheric pressure and surface winds derived from a simulation of Helene using a dynamical model of the atmosphere. The ocean model is able to capture the main features of the observed response at the coast of Newfoundland as seen in the available tide gauge data. Results show that the simulated sea level response at the coast is driven by a combination of wind stress and atmospheric pressure forcing, the former generally dominating. An exception is Conception Bay, Newfoundland, where the response is captured mainly by atmospheric pressure forcing. Offshore near the edge of the Grand Banks, atmospheric pressure and wind stress forcing are equally important. The wind-forced response depends on the divergence of the surface wind stress and hence on the structure of the storm in the atmospheric model simulation. Sensitivity studies show the importance of having a small time interval (on the order of minutes) at which the atmospheric forcing is supplied to the ocean model and show the importance of the location of the storm track.

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More information

Published date: October 2009
Keywords: tropical storm, ocean modeling, meteorological tsunami
Organisations: Physical Oceanography

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Local EPrints ID: 378184
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/378184
ISSN: 0148-0227
PURE UUID: af30f60c-e330-4975-82ca-8d26578c725c

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Date deposited: 19 Jun 2015 11:02
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 20:54

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