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Is the relationship between common mental disorder and adiposity bidirectional? Prospective analyses of a UK general population-based study

Is the relationship between common mental disorder and adiposity bidirectional? Prospective analyses of a UK general population-based study
Is the relationship between common mental disorder and adiposity bidirectional? Prospective analyses of a UK general population-based study
The direction of the association between mental health and adiposity is poorly understood. Our objective was to empirically examine this link in a UK study. This is a prospective cohort study of 3 388 people (men) aged ? 18 years at study induction who participated in both the UK Health and Lifestyle Survey at baseline (HALS-1, 1984/1985) and the re-survey (HALS-2, 1991/1992). At both survey examinations, body mass index, waist circumference and self-reported common mental disorder (the 30-item General Health Questionnaire, GHQ) were measured. Logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (OR) and accompanying 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations between (1) baseline common mental disorder (QHQ score > 4) and subsequent general and abdominal obesity and (2) baseline general and abdominal obesity and re-survey common mental disorders. After controlling for a range of covariates, participants with common mental disorder at baseline experienced greater odds of subsequently becoming overweight (women, OR: 1.30, 1.03 – 1.64; men, 1.05, 0.81 – 1.38) and obese (women, 1.26, 0.82 – 1.94; men, OR: 2.10, 1.23 – 3.55) than those who were free of common mental disorder. Similarly, having baseline common mental health disorder was also related to a greater risk of developing moderate (1.57, 1.21 – 2.04) and severe (1.48, 1.09 – 2.01) abdominal obesity (women only). Baseline general or abdominal obesity was not associated with the risk of future common mental disorder. These findings of the present study suggest that the direction of association between common mental disorders and adiposity is from common mental disorder to increased future risk of adiposity as opposed to the converse
1932-6203
e0119970
Fezeu, L.K.
c5e3a8bc-3786-45f1-bd59-0dbfe8278836
Batty, G.D.
bf322937-2cfb-4174-b5cb-dc016f0d0b8a
Gale, C.R.
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Kivimaki, M.
87a6c408-c8b5-48dc-b2c0-e1f425b91dc6
Hercberg, S.
458b1b2c-1e2a-4176-9e81-1ec152ef3d45
Czernichow, S.
0fce8ba5-511e-431d-a287-4ea07e920f0b
Fezeu, L.K.
c5e3a8bc-3786-45f1-bd59-0dbfe8278836
Batty, G.D.
bf322937-2cfb-4174-b5cb-dc016f0d0b8a
Gale, C.R.
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Kivimaki, M.
87a6c408-c8b5-48dc-b2c0-e1f425b91dc6
Hercberg, S.
458b1b2c-1e2a-4176-9e81-1ec152ef3d45
Czernichow, S.
0fce8ba5-511e-431d-a287-4ea07e920f0b

Fezeu, L.K., Batty, G.D., Gale, C.R., Kivimaki, M., Hercberg, S. and Czernichow, S. (2015) Is the relationship between common mental disorder and adiposity bidirectional? Prospective analyses of a UK general population-based study. PLoS ONE, 10 (5), e0119970. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0119970.). (PMID:25993130)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The direction of the association between mental health and adiposity is poorly understood. Our objective was to empirically examine this link in a UK study. This is a prospective cohort study of 3 388 people (men) aged ? 18 years at study induction who participated in both the UK Health and Lifestyle Survey at baseline (HALS-1, 1984/1985) and the re-survey (HALS-2, 1991/1992). At both survey examinations, body mass index, waist circumference and self-reported common mental disorder (the 30-item General Health Questionnaire, GHQ) were measured. Logistic regression models were used to compute odds ratios (OR) and accompanying 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations between (1) baseline common mental disorder (QHQ score > 4) and subsequent general and abdominal obesity and (2) baseline general and abdominal obesity and re-survey common mental disorders. After controlling for a range of covariates, participants with common mental disorder at baseline experienced greater odds of subsequently becoming overweight (women, OR: 1.30, 1.03 – 1.64; men, 1.05, 0.81 – 1.38) and obese (women, 1.26, 0.82 – 1.94; men, OR: 2.10, 1.23 – 3.55) than those who were free of common mental disorder. Similarly, having baseline common mental health disorder was also related to a greater risk of developing moderate (1.57, 1.21 – 2.04) and severe (1.48, 1.09 – 2.01) abdominal obesity (women only). Baseline general or abdominal obesity was not associated with the risk of future common mental disorder. These findings of the present study suggest that the direction of association between common mental disorders and adiposity is from common mental disorder to increased future risk of adiposity as opposed to the converse

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Accepted/In Press date: 4 February 2015
Published date: 18 May 2015
Organisations: MRC Life-Course Epidemiology Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 378701
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/378701
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: 9c482e5f-4cba-456b-b94b-786fbbaebb63
ORCID for C.R. Gale: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3361-8638

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Date deposited: 09 Jul 2015 09:21
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 01:39

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Contributors

Author: L.K. Fezeu
Author: G.D. Batty
Author: C.R. Gale ORCID iD
Author: M. Kivimaki
Author: S. Hercberg
Author: S. Czernichow

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