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Can skin exposure to sunlight prevent liver inflammation?

Can skin exposure to sunlight prevent liver inflammation?
Can skin exposure to sunlight prevent liver inflammation?
Liver inflammation contributes towards the pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Here we discuss how skin exposure to sunlight may suppress liver inflammation and the severity of NAFLD. Following exposure to sunlight-derived ultraviolet radiation (UVR), the skin releases anti-inflammatory mediators such as vitamin D and nitric oxide. Animal modeling studies suggest that exposure to UVR can prevent the development of NAFLD. Association studies also support a negative link between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and NAFLD incidence or severity. Clinical trials are in their infancy and are yet to demonstrate a clear beneficial effect of vitamin D supplementation. There are a number of potentially interdependent mechanisms whereby vitamin D could dampen liver inflammation, by inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis and liver fibrosis, modulating the gut microbiome and through altered production and transport of bile acids. While there has been a focus on vitamin D, other mediators induced by sun exposure, such as nitric oxide may also play important roles in curtailing liver inflammation
3219-3239
Gorman, Shelley
011f6b03-7b50-4c96-ab5e-9b0f6cc5c25d
Black, Lucinda J.
1ae17089-3bca-480d-a09c-ee1f9f349e95
Feelisch, Martin
8c1b9965-8614-4e85-b2c6-458a2e17eafd
Hart, Prue H.
30c350e2-ec01-48e9-8c5e-9ada39ab17ef
Weller, Richard
2f4ba01d-704b-421f-a486-9928b50793f9
Gorman, Shelley
011f6b03-7b50-4c96-ab5e-9b0f6cc5c25d
Black, Lucinda J.
1ae17089-3bca-480d-a09c-ee1f9f349e95
Feelisch, Martin
8c1b9965-8614-4e85-b2c6-458a2e17eafd
Hart, Prue H.
30c350e2-ec01-48e9-8c5e-9ada39ab17ef
Weller, Richard
2f4ba01d-704b-421f-a486-9928b50793f9

Gorman, Shelley, Black, Lucinda J., Feelisch, Martin, Hart, Prue H. and Weller, Richard (2015) Can skin exposure to sunlight prevent liver inflammation? Nutrients, 7 (5), 3219-3239. (doi:10.3390/nu7053219). (PMID:25951129)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Liver inflammation contributes towards the pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Here we discuss how skin exposure to sunlight may suppress liver inflammation and the severity of NAFLD. Following exposure to sunlight-derived ultraviolet radiation (UVR), the skin releases anti-inflammatory mediators such as vitamin D and nitric oxide. Animal modeling studies suggest that exposure to UVR can prevent the development of NAFLD. Association studies also support a negative link between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and NAFLD incidence or severity. Clinical trials are in their infancy and are yet to demonstrate a clear beneficial effect of vitamin D supplementation. There are a number of potentially interdependent mechanisms whereby vitamin D could dampen liver inflammation, by inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis and liver fibrosis, modulating the gut microbiome and through altered production and transport of bile acids. While there has been a focus on vitamin D, other mediators induced by sun exposure, such as nitric oxide may also play important roles in curtailing liver inflammation

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Accepted/In Press date: 27 April 2015
Published date: 5 May 2015
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 378734
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/378734
PURE UUID: aee4fd50-89e9-4fce-835f-d54d2d576609
ORCID for Martin Feelisch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2320-1158

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jul 2015 12:33
Last modified: 17 Jul 2019 00:40

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