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Efficacy of humidity retention bags for the reduced adsorption and improved cleaning of tissue proteins including prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel surfaces

Efficacy of humidity retention bags for the reduced adsorption and improved cleaning of tissue proteins including prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel surfaces
Efficacy of humidity retention bags for the reduced adsorption and improved cleaning of tissue proteins including prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel surfaces
Increasing drying time adversely affects attachment of tissue proteins and prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel, and reduces the efficacy of commercial cleaning chemistries. This study tested the efficacy of commercial humidity retention bags to reduce biofouling on surgical stainless steel and to improve subsequent cleaning. Surgical stainless steel surfaces were contaminated with ME7-infected brain homogenates and left to dry for 15 to 1,440 min either in air, in dry polythene bags or within humidity retention bags. Residual contamination pre/post cleaning was analysed using Thioflavin T/SYPRO Ruby dual staining and microscope analysis. An increase in biofouling was observed with increased drying time in air or in sealed dry bags. Humidity retention bags kept both protein and prion-associated amyloid minimal across the drying times both pre- and post-cleaning. Therefore, humidity bags demonstrate a cheap, easy to implement solution to improve surgical instrument reprocessing and to potentially reduce associated hospital acquired infections.
0892-7014
535-541
Secker, T.
16b0a878-984f-4272-bfaa-667c7c63023a
Pinchin, H.
c77e0380-5445-4cc9-bfae-f550d1dbbea2
Hervé, R.
9baddc65-93cf-4a18-9388-088d60572b06
Keevil, C.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Secker, T.
16b0a878-984f-4272-bfaa-667c7c63023a
Pinchin, H.
c77e0380-5445-4cc9-bfae-f550d1dbbea2
Hervé, R.
9baddc65-93cf-4a18-9388-088d60572b06
Keevil, C.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb

Secker, T., Pinchin, H., Hervé, R. and Keevil, C. (2015) Efficacy of humidity retention bags for the reduced adsorption and improved cleaning of tissue proteins including prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel surfaces. Biofouling, 31 (6), 535-541. (doi:10.1080/08927014.2015.1067686).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Increasing drying time adversely affects attachment of tissue proteins and prion-associated amyloid to surgical stainless steel, and reduces the efficacy of commercial cleaning chemistries. This study tested the efficacy of commercial humidity retention bags to reduce biofouling on surgical stainless steel and to improve subsequent cleaning. Surgical stainless steel surfaces were contaminated with ME7-infected brain homogenates and left to dry for 15 to 1,440 min either in air, in dry polythene bags or within humidity retention bags. Residual contamination pre/post cleaning was analysed using Thioflavin T/SYPRO Ruby dual staining and microscope analysis. An increase in biofouling was observed with increased drying time in air or in sealed dry bags. Humidity retention bags kept both protein and prion-associated amyloid minimal across the drying times both pre- and post-cleaning. Therefore, humidity bags demonstrate a cheap, easy to implement solution to improve surgical instrument reprocessing and to potentially reduce associated hospital acquired infections.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 26 June 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 August 2015
Published date: 2015
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 378914
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/378914
ISSN: 0892-7014
PURE UUID: 95a30706-842e-441c-9448-63872e88f3bb
ORCID for T. Secker: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7168-8592
ORCID for R. Hervé: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8838-6515
ORCID for C. Keevil: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1917-7706

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jul 2015 13:45
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 01:58

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Contributors

Author: T. Secker ORCID iD
Author: H. Pinchin
Author: R. Hervé ORCID iD
Author: C. Keevil ORCID iD

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