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The promise of reverse vaccionology

The promise of reverse vaccionology
The promise of reverse vaccionology
Reverse vaccinology (RV) is a computational approach that aims to identify putative vaccine candidates in the protein coding genome (proteome) of pathogens. RV has primarily been applied to bacterial pathogens to identify proteins that can be formulated into subunit vaccines, which consist of one or more protein antigens. An RV approach based on a filtering method has already been used to construct a subunit vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B that is now registered in several countries (Bexsero). Recently, machine learning methods have been used to improve the ability of RV approaches to identify vaccine candidates. Further improvements related to the incorporation of epitope-binding annotation and gene expression data are discussed. In the future, it is envisaged that RV approaches will facilitate rapid vaccine design with less reliance on conventional animal testing and clinical trials in order to curb the threat of antibiotic resistance or newly emerged outbreaks of bacterial origin.
bacterial pathogen, epidemic, reverse vaccinology, subunit vaccine
1876-3413
85-89
Heinson, A.I.
0a92f240-5ada-4a32-8cb6-b92dc9e1dd70
Woelk, C.H.
4d3af0fd-658f-4626-b3b5-49a6192bcf7d
Newell, M.L.
005509fd-4c2c-463b-b6a8-85b954360922
Heinson, A.I.
0a92f240-5ada-4a32-8cb6-b92dc9e1dd70
Woelk, C.H.
4d3af0fd-658f-4626-b3b5-49a6192bcf7d
Newell, M.L.
005509fd-4c2c-463b-b6a8-85b954360922

Heinson, A.I., Woelk, C.H. and Newell, M.L. (2015) The promise of reverse vaccionology. International Health, 7 (2), 85-89. (doi:10.1093/inthealth/ihv002). (PMID:25733557)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Reverse vaccinology (RV) is a computational approach that aims to identify putative vaccine candidates in the protein coding genome (proteome) of pathogens. RV has primarily been applied to bacterial pathogens to identify proteins that can be formulated into subunit vaccines, which consist of one or more protein antigens. An RV approach based on a filtering method has already been used to construct a subunit vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B that is now registered in several countries (Bexsero). Recently, machine learning methods have been used to improve the ability of RV approaches to identify vaccine candidates. Further improvements related to the incorporation of epitope-binding annotation and gene expression data are discussed. In the future, it is envisaged that RV approaches will facilitate rapid vaccine design with less reliance on conventional animal testing and clinical trials in order to curb the threat of antibiotic resistance or newly emerged outbreaks of bacterial origin.

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Accepted/In Press date: 7 January 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 2 March 2015
Published date: 2015
Keywords: bacterial pathogen, epidemic, reverse vaccinology, subunit vaccine
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 379213
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/379213
ISSN: 1876-3413
PURE UUID: 61975551-b231-41a2-b0d8-66cdb57403b3

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Date deposited: 18 Jul 2015 15:02
Last modified: 17 Jul 2019 20:25

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