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Commitment and the changing sequence of cohabitation, childbearing and marriage: insights from qualitative research in the UK

Commitment and the changing sequence of cohabitation, childbearing and marriage: insights from qualitative research in the UK
Commitment and the changing sequence of cohabitation, childbearing and marriage: insights from qualitative research in the UK


Background: In the United Kingdom, standard, traditional sequences of family events have been replaced by a de-standardized life course; marriage is postponed and no longer necessary for childbearing; unmarried cohabitation has increased. New sequencing raises questions about the meaning of cohabitation and marriage in peoples’ lives.

Objective: We ask whether, and to what extent, the new sequencing of life events implies a shift in commitment in cohabitation, potentially giving rise to new expressions of commitment and understandings of cohabitation.

Methods: We analysed data from eight focus groups conducted in Southampton, England, by deductively following major themes outlined in the cross-national focus group guidelines, and inductively using themes raised by the respondents themselves.

Results: Personal commitment is similar in cohabiting and marital relationships, although marriage is perceived to embody greater moral and structural commitment. Since marriage is no longer required as a public display of commitment, the wedding has become more important as a symbolic event. Public displays of commitment are increasingly occurring in other ways, such as childbearing and joint mortgages, demonstrating that cohabiting couples can be as committed as married couples. Although couples discussed ways in which commitment could grow over time, this progression was not necessarily talked about in relation to the timing of childbearing. Highly educated groups seem to have a greater expectation than less educated groups that childbearing will follow marriage.

Conclusions: Commitment levels are no longer ascribed solely by union type, but rather by other life events and the couple's own perceived level of commitment.
cohabitation, commitment, educational differences, marriage, sequencing of life course
327-362
Berrington, Ann
bd0fc093-310d-4236-8126-ca0c7eb9ddde
Perelli-Harris, Brienna
9d3d6b25-d710-480b-8677-534d58ebe9ed
Trevena, Paulina
ea357454-39d9-4065-a4c7-8f77fed75760
Berrington, Ann
bd0fc093-310d-4236-8126-ca0c7eb9ddde
Perelli-Harris, Brienna
9d3d6b25-d710-480b-8677-534d58ebe9ed
Trevena, Paulina
ea357454-39d9-4065-a4c7-8f77fed75760

Berrington, Ann, Perelli-Harris, Brienna and Trevena, Paulina (2015) Commitment and the changing sequence of cohabitation, childbearing and marriage: insights from qualitative research in the UK. Demographic Research, 33, 327-362. (doi:10.4054/DemRes.2015.33.12).

Record type: Article

Abstract



Background: In the United Kingdom, standard, traditional sequences of family events have been replaced by a de-standardized life course; marriage is postponed and no longer necessary for childbearing; unmarried cohabitation has increased. New sequencing raises questions about the meaning of cohabitation and marriage in peoples’ lives.

Objective: We ask whether, and to what extent, the new sequencing of life events implies a shift in commitment in cohabitation, potentially giving rise to new expressions of commitment and understandings of cohabitation.

Methods: We analysed data from eight focus groups conducted in Southampton, England, by deductively following major themes outlined in the cross-national focus group guidelines, and inductively using themes raised by the respondents themselves.

Results: Personal commitment is similar in cohabiting and marital relationships, although marriage is perceived to embody greater moral and structural commitment. Since marriage is no longer required as a public display of commitment, the wedding has become more important as a symbolic event. Public displays of commitment are increasingly occurring in other ways, such as childbearing and joint mortgages, demonstrating that cohabiting couples can be as committed as married couples. Although couples discussed ways in which commitment could grow over time, this progression was not necessarily talked about in relation to the timing of childbearing. Highly educated groups seem to have a greater expectation than less educated groups that childbearing will follow marriage.

Conclusions: Commitment levels are no longer ascribed solely by union type, but rather by other life events and the couple's own perceived level of commitment.

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Published date: 25 August 2015
Keywords: cohabitation, commitment, educational differences, marriage, sequencing of life course
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

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Local EPrints ID: 379384
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/379384
PURE UUID: cada4834-e5ba-4ccf-9f26-7895ce6cf09b

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Date deposited: 28 Jul 2015 08:58
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 20:43

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