The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Ocean nutrient pathways associated with the passage of a storm

Ocean nutrient pathways associated with the passage of a storm
Ocean nutrient pathways associated with the passage of a storm
Storms that affect ocean surface layer dynamics and primary production are a frequent occurrence in the open North Atlantic Ocean. In this study we use an interdisciplinary dataset collected in the region to quantify nutrient supply by two pathways associated with a storm event: entrainment of nutrients during a period of high wind forcing and subsequent shear-spiking at the pycnocline due to interactions of storm generated inertial currents with wind. The post-storm increase in surface layer nitrate (by ~20 mmol m?2) was predominantly driven by the first pathway: nutrient intrusion during the storm. Alignment of post-storm inertial currents and surface wind stress caused shear instabilities at the ocean pycnocline, forming the second pathway for nutrient transport into the euphotic zone. During the alignment period, pulses of high turbulent nitrate flux through the pycnocline (up to 1 mmol m?2 day?1; approximately 25 times higher than the background flux) were detected. However, the impact of the post-storm supply was an order of magnitude lower than during the storm due to the short duration of the pulses. Cumulatively, the storm passage was equivalent to 2.5-5 % of the nitrate supplied by winter convection and had a significant effect compared to previously reported (sub)-mesoscale dynamics in the region. As storms occur frequently, they can form an important component in local nutrient budgets.
storms, nutrients, diapycnal mixing, inertial currents, North Atlantic Ocean
0886-6236
1179-1189
Rumyantseva, Anna
44ccfbcf-2dc4-48ea-86f3-85eb511acac6
Lucas, Natasha
4f8f727f-4444-4ee5-b05d-f1039b79659f
Rippeth, Tom
75cdc018-b569-4ae6-b782-8f6ca030bbb3
Martin, Adrian
9d0d480d-9b3c-44c2-aafe-bb980ed98a6d
Painter, Stuart C.
29e32f35-4ee8-4654-b305-4dbe5a312295
Boyd, Timothy J.
825dcf37-7de3-45ad-b9a0-413060fef8b4
Henson, Stephanie
d6532e17-a65b-4d7b-9ee3-755ecb565c19
Rumyantseva, Anna
44ccfbcf-2dc4-48ea-86f3-85eb511acac6
Lucas, Natasha
4f8f727f-4444-4ee5-b05d-f1039b79659f
Rippeth, Tom
75cdc018-b569-4ae6-b782-8f6ca030bbb3
Martin, Adrian
9d0d480d-9b3c-44c2-aafe-bb980ed98a6d
Painter, Stuart C.
29e32f35-4ee8-4654-b305-4dbe5a312295
Boyd, Timothy J.
825dcf37-7de3-45ad-b9a0-413060fef8b4
Henson, Stephanie
d6532e17-a65b-4d7b-9ee3-755ecb565c19

Rumyantseva, Anna, Lucas, Natasha, Rippeth, Tom, Martin, Adrian, Painter, Stuart C., Boyd, Timothy J. and Henson, Stephanie (2015) Ocean nutrient pathways associated with the passage of a storm. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 29 (8), 1179-1189. (doi:10.1002/2015GB005097).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Storms that affect ocean surface layer dynamics and primary production are a frequent occurrence in the open North Atlantic Ocean. In this study we use an interdisciplinary dataset collected in the region to quantify nutrient supply by two pathways associated with a storm event: entrainment of nutrients during a period of high wind forcing and subsequent shear-spiking at the pycnocline due to interactions of storm generated inertial currents with wind. The post-storm increase in surface layer nitrate (by ~20 mmol m?2) was predominantly driven by the first pathway: nutrient intrusion during the storm. Alignment of post-storm inertial currents and surface wind stress caused shear instabilities at the ocean pycnocline, forming the second pathway for nutrient transport into the euphotic zone. During the alignment period, pulses of high turbulent nitrate flux through the pycnocline (up to 1 mmol m?2 day?1; approximately 25 times higher than the background flux) were detected. However, the impact of the post-storm supply was an order of magnitude lower than during the storm due to the short duration of the pulses. Cumulatively, the storm passage was equivalent to 2.5-5 % of the nitrate supplied by winter convection and had a significant effect compared to previously reported (sub)-mesoscale dynamics in the region. As storms occur frequently, they can form an important component in local nutrient budgets.

Text
gbc20303.pdf - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (1MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: July 2015
Published date: August 2015
Keywords: storms, nutrients, diapycnal mixing, inertial currents, North Atlantic Ocean
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Marine Biogeochemistry

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 379443
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/379443
ISSN: 0886-6236
PURE UUID: 50fc4a0f-6feb-40d1-b3d5-84f638fd6727

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Jul 2015 15:32
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 05:58

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Anna Rumyantseva
Author: Natasha Lucas
Author: Tom Rippeth
Author: Adrian Martin
Author: Stuart C. Painter
Author: Timothy J. Boyd

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×