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Registering a methodology for imaging and analysis of residual-limb shape after transtibial amputation

Registering a methodology for imaging and analysis of residual-limb shape after transtibial amputation
Registering a methodology for imaging and analysis of residual-limb shape after transtibial amputation
Successful prosthetic rehabilitation following lower-limb amputation depends upon a safe and comfortable socket-residual limb interface. Current practice predominantly uses a subjective, iterative process to establish socket shape, often requiring several visits to a prosthetist. This study ??proposes an objective methodology for residual-limb shape scanning and analysis by high-resolution, automated measurements. A 3-D printed "analog" residuum was scanned with three surface digitizers on 10 occasions. Accuracy was measured by the scan-height error between repeat analog scans and the computer-aided design (CAD) geometry and the scan versus CAD volume. Subsequently, 20 male residuum casts from ambulatory individuals with transtibial amputation were scanned by two observers, and 10 were repeat-scanned by one observer. The shape files were aligned spatially, and geometric measurements were extracted. Repeatability was evaluated by intraclass correlation, Bland-Altman analysis of scan volumes, and pairwise root-mean-square error ranges of scan area and width profiles. Submillimeter accuracy was achieved when scanning the analog shape using white light and laser scanning technologies. Scanning male residuum casts was highly repeatable within and between observers. The analysis methodology technique provides clinical researchers and prosthetists the capability to establish their own quantitative, objective, multipatient datasets. This could provide an evidence base for training, long-term follow-up, and interpatient outcome comparison, for decision support in socket design.
amputation, CAD/CAM, prostheses, residual-limb shape, residuum volume, shape analysis, socket interface, surface scanning, reliability, validity
0748-7711
207-218
Dickinson, A.S.
10151972-c1b5-4f7d-bc12-6482b5870cad
Steer, J.W.
b958f526-9782-4e36-9c49-ad48e8f650ed
Woods, C.J.
5ea42fb4-9429-4d53-a13f-5d9a2bc4a88c
Worsley, P.R.
6d33aee3-ef43-468d-aef6-86d190de6756
Dickinson, A.S.
10151972-c1b5-4f7d-bc12-6482b5870cad
Steer, J.W.
b958f526-9782-4e36-9c49-ad48e8f650ed
Woods, C.J.
5ea42fb4-9429-4d53-a13f-5d9a2bc4a88c
Worsley, P.R.
6d33aee3-ef43-468d-aef6-86d190de6756

Dickinson, A.S., Steer, J.W., Woods, C.J. and Worsley, P.R. (2016) Registering a methodology for imaging and analysis of residual-limb shape after transtibial amputation. The Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 53 (2), 207-218. (doi:10.1682/JRRD.2014.10.0272).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Successful prosthetic rehabilitation following lower-limb amputation depends upon a safe and comfortable socket-residual limb interface. Current practice predominantly uses a subjective, iterative process to establish socket shape, often requiring several visits to a prosthetist. This study ??proposes an objective methodology for residual-limb shape scanning and analysis by high-resolution, automated measurements. A 3-D printed "analog" residuum was scanned with three surface digitizers on 10 occasions. Accuracy was measured by the scan-height error between repeat analog scans and the computer-aided design (CAD) geometry and the scan versus CAD volume. Subsequently, 20 male residuum casts from ambulatory individuals with transtibial amputation were scanned by two observers, and 10 were repeat-scanned by one observer. The shape files were aligned spatially, and geometric measurements were extracted. Repeatability was evaluated by intraclass correlation, Bland-Altman analysis of scan volumes, and pairwise root-mean-square error ranges of scan area and width profiles. Submillimeter accuracy was achieved when scanning the analog shape using white light and laser scanning technologies. Scanning male residuum casts was highly repeatable within and between observers. The analysis methodology technique provides clinical researchers and prosthetists the capability to establish their own quantitative, objective, multipatient datasets. This could provide an evidence base for training, long-term follow-up, and interpatient outcome comparison, for decision support in socket design.

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More information

Submitted date: 31 October 2014
Accepted/In Press date: 23 June 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 April 2016
Published date: 14 April 2016
Keywords: amputation, CAD/CAM, prostheses, residual-limb shape, residuum volume, shape analysis, socket interface, surface scanning, reliability, validity
Organisations: Bioengineering Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 379483
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/379483
ISSN: 0748-7711
PURE UUID: cc0e0093-9396-4f19-9e92-1792cee0fa52
ORCID for A.S. Dickinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9647-1944
ORCID for J.W. Steer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6288-1347
ORCID for P.R. Worsley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0145-5042

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Date deposited: 28 Jul 2015 13:25
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 05:23

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