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Deposition of thin films via forward and backward femtosecond laser-induced transfer using spatial beam shaping via a digital micromirror device

Deposition of thin films via forward and backward femtosecond laser-induced transfer using spatial beam shaping via a digital micromirror device
Deposition of thin films via forward and backward femtosecond laser-induced transfer using spatial beam shaping via a digital micromirror device
Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a technique for depositing pixels from thin film donor materials. During LIFT, a pixel is released from a donor-coated transparent receiver placed in contact or close proximity to a receiver substrate due to the action of the laser pulse/pulses absorbed in a small volume of the donor or auxiliary sacrificial layer. In contrast to forward transfer, if the (transparent) receiver substrate lies in the beam path, pixels can be transferred in the backward direction and the process is then referred to as laser-induced backward transfer (LIBT).

If transfer of pixels is required with specific shapes however, then there are two choices: use a fixed aperture to spatially format the incident laser pulse, or use a spatial light modulator to dynamically pattern the spatial profile of the incident laser pulse. In this work we have used a spatial light modulator (a Texas Instruments digital micromirror device, DMD) to adaptively control the incident laser pulse to have spatial profiles such as geometric and alphabetic shapes for both LIFT and LIBT. The clear advantage of using the DMD approach is that pixels of essentially arbitrary shapes can be transferred on a shot-to-shot basis.

We have investigated DMD-assisted transfer of a range of materials including glasses, compound semiconductors, silicon and polymers, with the greatest success in terms of shape fidelity and lack of material damage in the case of the latter. Features have been printed via LIFT and LIBT with size scales in the region of tens of microns, and we will present our most recent optimised results and draw conclusions concerning the more widespread use of DMD-assisted materials transfer.
Eason, R.W.
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Feinäugle, M.
3b15dc5b-ff52-4232-9632-b1be238a750c
Heath, D.J.
d53c269d-90d2-41e6-aa63-a03f8f014d21
Grant-Jacob, J.A.
c5d144d8-3c43-4195-8e80-edd96bfda91b
Mills, B.
05f1886e-96ef-420f-b856-4115f4ab36d0
Eason, R.W.
e38684c3-d18c-41b9-a4aa-def67283b020
Feinäugle, M.
3b15dc5b-ff52-4232-9632-b1be238a750c
Heath, D.J.
d53c269d-90d2-41e6-aa63-a03f8f014d21
Grant-Jacob, J.A.
c5d144d8-3c43-4195-8e80-edd96bfda91b
Mills, B.
05f1886e-96ef-420f-b856-4115f4ab36d0

Eason, R.W., Feinäugle, M., Heath, D.J., Grant-Jacob, J.A. and Mills, B. (2015) Deposition of thin films via forward and backward femtosecond laser-induced transfer using spatial beam shaping via a digital micromirror device. E-MRS Spring Meeting, France. 11 - 15 May 2015.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a technique for depositing pixels from thin film donor materials. During LIFT, a pixel is released from a donor-coated transparent receiver placed in contact or close proximity to a receiver substrate due to the action of the laser pulse/pulses absorbed in a small volume of the donor or auxiliary sacrificial layer. In contrast to forward transfer, if the (transparent) receiver substrate lies in the beam path, pixels can be transferred in the backward direction and the process is then referred to as laser-induced backward transfer (LIBT).

If transfer of pixels is required with specific shapes however, then there are two choices: use a fixed aperture to spatially format the incident laser pulse, or use a spatial light modulator to dynamically pattern the spatial profile of the incident laser pulse. In this work we have used a spatial light modulator (a Texas Instruments digital micromirror device, DMD) to adaptively control the incident laser pulse to have spatial profiles such as geometric and alphabetic shapes for both LIFT and LIBT. The clear advantage of using the DMD approach is that pixels of essentially arbitrary shapes can be transferred on a shot-to-shot basis.

We have investigated DMD-assisted transfer of a range of materials including glasses, compound semiconductors, silicon and polymers, with the greatest success in terms of shape fidelity and lack of material damage in the case of the latter. Features have been printed via LIFT and LIBT with size scales in the region of tens of microns, and we will present our most recent optimised results and draw conclusions concerning the more widespread use of DMD-assisted materials transfer.

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More information

Published date: May 2015
Venue - Dates: E-MRS Spring Meeting, France, 2015-05-11 - 2015-05-15
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 379628
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/379628
PURE UUID: a73f1931-2e01-425d-9879-14587b743aa1
ORCID for R.W. Eason: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9704-2204
ORCID for J.A. Grant-Jacob: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4270-4247
ORCID for B. Mills: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1784-1012

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Jul 2015 12:01
Last modified: 20 Nov 2018 01:36

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Contributors

Author: R.W. Eason ORCID iD
Author: M. Feinäugle
Author: D.J. Heath
Author: B. Mills ORCID iD

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