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Self-management and self-management support outcomes: a systematic review and mixed research synthesis of stakeholder views

Self-management and self-management support outcomes: a systematic review and mixed research synthesis of stakeholder views
Self-management and self-management support outcomes: a systematic review and mixed research synthesis of stakeholder views
Introduction: Self-management has received growing attention as an effective approach for long-term condition management. Little is known about which outcomes of supported self-management are valued by patients, their families, health professionals and those who commission self-management services. This study systematically reviewed published empirical evidence in accordance with PRISMA guidelines to determine the outcomes of self-management valued by these key stakeholder groups, using three prominent exemplar conditions: colorectal cancer, diabetes and stroke.

Aim: To systematically review the literature to identify which generic outcomes of self-management have been targeted and are considered important using three exemplar conditions (colorectal cancer, diabetes and stroke), which collectively have a range of features that are likely to be representative of generic self-management issues.

Methods: Systematic searching of nine electronic databases was conducted in addition to hand searches of review articles. Abstracts were identified against inclusion criteria and appraised independently by two reviewers, using a critical appraisal tool. Synthesis of findings was conducted using mixed research synthesis.

Results: Over 20,536 abstracts were screened. 41 studies which met the review criteria were fully retrieved and appraised. The majority of evidence related to diabetes. Few studies directly focussed on stakeholders’ views concerning desired self-management outcomes; the majority of evidence was derived from studies focusing upon the experience of self-management. The views of health care commissioners were absent from the literature. We identified that self-management outcomes embrace a range of indicators, from knowledge, skills, and bio-psychosocial markers of health through to positive social networks.

Conclusions: Patients’, families’, health professionals’ and commissioners’ views regarding which outcomes of self-management are important have not been clearly elicited. The extent to which bio-psychosocial indicators relate to successful self-management from the perspectives of all groups of stakeholders is unknown. Further investigation regarding which self-management outcomes are considered important by all stakeholders is necessary to guide the commissioning and design of future self-management services.
1932-6203
1-25
Boger, Emma
aca6a969-75e8-4e1d-9dc8-30381875e3ef
Ellis, Jaimie
eb60a3a4-281b-4895-9583-4d5cf1e65b4d
Latter, S.
83f100a4-95ec-4f2e-99a5-186095de2f3b
Foster, Claire
00786ac1-bd47-4aeb-a0e2-40e058695b73
Kennedy, Anne
e059c1c7-d6d0-41c8-95e1-95e5273b07f8
Jones, Fiona
0471df62-9a7b-426d-ba66-5469a0bbbc0b
Fenerty, Vicky
5edbe55b-e185-4e44-a81d-34065cc28df7
Kellar, Ian
a99894ae-a446-4cef-abdc-55d18443d556
Demain, Sara
09b1124d-750a-4eb1-90c7-91f5f222fc31
Boger, Emma
aca6a969-75e8-4e1d-9dc8-30381875e3ef
Ellis, Jaimie
eb60a3a4-281b-4895-9583-4d5cf1e65b4d
Latter, S.
83f100a4-95ec-4f2e-99a5-186095de2f3b
Foster, Claire
00786ac1-bd47-4aeb-a0e2-40e058695b73
Kennedy, Anne
e059c1c7-d6d0-41c8-95e1-95e5273b07f8
Jones, Fiona
0471df62-9a7b-426d-ba66-5469a0bbbc0b
Fenerty, Vicky
5edbe55b-e185-4e44-a81d-34065cc28df7
Kellar, Ian
a99894ae-a446-4cef-abdc-55d18443d556
Demain, Sara
09b1124d-750a-4eb1-90c7-91f5f222fc31

Boger, Emma, Ellis, Jaimie, Latter, S., Foster, Claire, Kennedy, Anne, Jones, Fiona, Fenerty, Vicky, Kellar, Ian and Demain, Sara (2015) Self-management and self-management support outcomes: a systematic review and mixed research synthesis of stakeholder views. PLoS ONE, 10 (7), 1-25. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0130990). (PMID:26162086)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction: Self-management has received growing attention as an effective approach for long-term condition management. Little is known about which outcomes of supported self-management are valued by patients, their families, health professionals and those who commission self-management services. This study systematically reviewed published empirical evidence in accordance with PRISMA guidelines to determine the outcomes of self-management valued by these key stakeholder groups, using three prominent exemplar conditions: colorectal cancer, diabetes and stroke.

Aim: To systematically review the literature to identify which generic outcomes of self-management have been targeted and are considered important using three exemplar conditions (colorectal cancer, diabetes and stroke), which collectively have a range of features that are likely to be representative of generic self-management issues.

Methods: Systematic searching of nine electronic databases was conducted in addition to hand searches of review articles. Abstracts were identified against inclusion criteria and appraised independently by two reviewers, using a critical appraisal tool. Synthesis of findings was conducted using mixed research synthesis.

Results: Over 20,536 abstracts were screened. 41 studies which met the review criteria were fully retrieved and appraised. The majority of evidence related to diabetes. Few studies directly focussed on stakeholders’ views concerning desired self-management outcomes; the majority of evidence was derived from studies focusing upon the experience of self-management. The views of health care commissioners were absent from the literature. We identified that self-management outcomes embrace a range of indicators, from knowledge, skills, and bio-psychosocial markers of health through to positive social networks.

Conclusions: Patients’, families’, health professionals’ and commissioners’ views regarding which outcomes of self-management are important have not been clearly elicited. The extent to which bio-psychosocial indicators relate to successful self-management from the perspectives of all groups of stakeholders is unknown. Further investigation regarding which self-management outcomes are considered important by all stakeholders is necessary to guide the commissioning and design of future self-management services.

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Accepted/In Press date: 23 June 2015
Published date: 10 July 2015
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 379703
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/379703
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: d8e24b23-4109-4f1d-816d-1ab024f98e36
ORCID for Jaimie Ellis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0068-3318
ORCID for S. Latter: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0973-0512
ORCID for Claire Foster: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4703-8378
ORCID for Anne Kennedy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4570-9104
ORCID for Vicky Fenerty: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1712-5614

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 Aug 2015 13:52
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:51

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Contributors

Author: Emma Boger
Author: Jaimie Ellis ORCID iD
Author: S. Latter ORCID iD
Author: Claire Foster ORCID iD
Author: Anne Kennedy ORCID iD
Author: Fiona Jones
Author: Vicky Fenerty ORCID iD
Author: Ian Kellar
Author: Sara Demain

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