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Schenker, Cube and Schubert's 'Der Doppelgänger'

Schenker, Cube and Schubert's 'Der Doppelgänger'
Schenker, Cube and Schubert's 'Der Doppelgänger'
Schubert's 'Der Doppelgänger' is among the composer's most-analysed works. Yet, in spite of numerous published Schenkerian readings, Schenker's own analytical sketches of the song remain largely neglected. His work on 'Der Doppelgänger' was prompted by a letter from Felix-Eberhard von Cube of 8 May 1932, which enclosed a voice-leading analysis. Although this analysis does not survive, the broad outline of Cube's reading can be reconstructed from the letter. Schenker's reply to Cube is not known to survive, but a diary entry of 17 July 1932 records work on the song and the sending of a 'solution' to his former pupil; sketches in the Oster Collection, also dating from 17 July 1932, further document the theorist's work on the song that day.

Schenker appears to settle on an Urlinie that descends from 3, in contrast to the primary tone of 5 that features not only in Cube's original analysis but also in many recently published ones. In choosing a 3-line, Schenker places great weight on the relationship between the song's Urlinie and its four-note ostinato motive, and the sketches illustrate how his concerns are similar to those of modern-day theorists working three-quarters of a century later.
1468-2249
175-199
Bretherton, David
5d675429-1285-4ab3-9e59-3907afc60390
Bretherton, David
5d675429-1285-4ab3-9e59-3907afc60390

Bretherton, David (2015) Schenker, Cube and Schubert's 'Der Doppelgänger'. Music Analysis, 34 (2), 175-199. (doi:10.1111/musa.12048).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Schubert's 'Der Doppelgänger' is among the composer's most-analysed works. Yet, in spite of numerous published Schenkerian readings, Schenker's own analytical sketches of the song remain largely neglected. His work on 'Der Doppelgänger' was prompted by a letter from Felix-Eberhard von Cube of 8 May 1932, which enclosed a voice-leading analysis. Although this analysis does not survive, the broad outline of Cube's reading can be reconstructed from the letter. Schenker's reply to Cube is not known to survive, but a diary entry of 17 July 1932 records work on the song and the sending of a 'solution' to his former pupil; sketches in the Oster Collection, also dating from 17 July 1932, further document the theorist's work on the song that day.

Schenker appears to settle on an Urlinie that descends from 3, in contrast to the primary tone of 5 that features not only in Cube's original analysis but also in many recently published ones. In choosing a 3-line, Schenker places great weight on the relationship between the song's Urlinie and its four-note ostinato motive, and the sketches illustrate how his concerns are similar to those of modern-day theorists working three-quarters of a century later.

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Accepted/In Press date: January 2015
Published date: July 2015
Organisations: Music

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 379752
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/379752
ISSN: 1468-2249
PURE UUID: 12a9f827-5a17-4b9c-9052-f4f1b2b40cb3

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Aug 2015 09:26
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 20:38

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