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Exploring the effects of self-esteem and mortality salience on proximal and distally measured death-anxiety: a further test of the dual process model of terror management

Exploring the effects of self-esteem and mortality salience on proximal and distally measured death-anxiety: a further test of the dual process model of terror management
Exploring the effects of self-esteem and mortality salience on proximal and distally measured death-anxiety: a further test of the dual process model of terror management
The dual process model of terror management theory posits that proximal and distal defenses prevent death-related cognition from leading to death-anxiety. Further, the theory identifies self-esteem as a trait level resource that helps people avoid the awareness of deathanxiety. However, to date, no studies have examined the proximal and distal effects of death-related cognition and self-esteem on death-anxiety. In the present study, we assessed trait self-esteem, manipulated the awareness of death (mortality salience), and measured death-anxiety either immediately (proximally) or after a delay/distraction task (distally). Mortality salience did not lead to increased death-anxiety immediately after the mortality salience, but did so after a delay. Furthermore, this distal increase in death anxiety was only observed at low levels of selfesteem
0146-7239
523-528
Abeyta, Andrew
1d566033-235c-45d5-85e7-f7a0c85dc316
Juhl, Jacob
1c3b38b1-ba9e-4f3c-8520-ebca3b712fa2
Routledge, Clay
c1e0088a-3cc4-4d54-bbd3-de7d286429d8
Abeyta, Andrew
1d566033-235c-45d5-85e7-f7a0c85dc316
Juhl, Jacob
1c3b38b1-ba9e-4f3c-8520-ebca3b712fa2
Routledge, Clay
c1e0088a-3cc4-4d54-bbd3-de7d286429d8

Abeyta, Andrew, Juhl, Jacob and Routledge, Clay (2014) Exploring the effects of self-esteem and mortality salience on proximal and distally measured death-anxiety: a further test of the dual process model of terror management. Motivation and Emotion, 38 (4), 523-528. (doi:10.1007/s11031-014-9400-y).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The dual process model of terror management theory posits that proximal and distal defenses prevent death-related cognition from leading to death-anxiety. Further, the theory identifies self-esteem as a trait level resource that helps people avoid the awareness of deathanxiety. However, to date, no studies have examined the proximal and distal effects of death-related cognition and self-esteem on death-anxiety. In the present study, we assessed trait self-esteem, manipulated the awareness of death (mortality salience), and measured death-anxiety either immediately (proximally) or after a delay/distraction task (distally). Mortality salience did not lead to increased death-anxiety immediately after the mortality salience, but did so after a delay. Furthermore, this distal increase in death anxiety was only observed at low levels of selfesteem

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Published date: August 2014
Organisations: Psychology

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Local EPrints ID: 380038
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380038
ISSN: 0146-7239
PURE UUID: b188c4f9-714c-47f8-9e77-688efceff670

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Date deposited: 28 Aug 2015 14:12
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 21:10

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Author: Andrew Abeyta
Author: Jacob Juhl
Author: Clay Routledge

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