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The existential consequences of an unjust world: the effects of individual differences in belief in a just world and just world threats on death-thought accessibility

The existential consequences of an unjust world: the effects of individual differences in belief in a just world and just world threats on death-thought accessibility
The existential consequences of an unjust world: the effects of individual differences in belief in a just world and just world threats on death-thought accessibility
Research has demonstrated that undermining cultural worldviews increases death-thought accessibility (DTA). However, individual differences in commitment to a particular worldview may predict DTA when that belief is challenged. In the present research, we tested if individual differences in belief in a just world (BJW) relate to DTA when the BJW is undermined. In Studies 1 and 3, BJW was associated with DTA when people reflected on an unfair experience. Study 3 indicated that this effect is driven by general BJW. In Study 2, BJW was associated with DTA after the 2012 presidential election among individuals who supported the losing candidate
0197-3533
452-460
Roylance, Christina
3cdd1fd8-abcf-48fb-b362-07c183a32ef2
Abeyta, Andrew
1d566033-235c-45d5-85e7-f7a0c85dc316
Routledge, Clay
c1e0088a-3cc4-4d54-bbd3-de7d286429d8
Juhl, Jacob
1c3b38b1-ba9e-4f3c-8520-ebca3b712fa2
Roylance, Christina
3cdd1fd8-abcf-48fb-b362-07c183a32ef2
Abeyta, Andrew
1d566033-235c-45d5-85e7-f7a0c85dc316
Routledge, Clay
c1e0088a-3cc4-4d54-bbd3-de7d286429d8
Juhl, Jacob
1c3b38b1-ba9e-4f3c-8520-ebca3b712fa2

Roylance, Christina, Abeyta, Andrew, Routledge, Clay and Juhl, Jacob (2014) The existential consequences of an unjust world: the effects of individual differences in belief in a just world and just world threats on death-thought accessibility. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 36 (5), 452-460. (doi:10.1080/01973533.2014.944312).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Research has demonstrated that undermining cultural worldviews increases death-thought accessibility (DTA). However, individual differences in commitment to a particular worldview may predict DTA when that belief is challenged. In the present research, we tested if individual differences in belief in a just world (BJW) relate to DTA when the BJW is undermined. In Studies 1 and 3, BJW was associated with DTA when people reflected on an unfair experience. Study 3 indicated that this effect is driven by general BJW. In Study 2, BJW was associated with DTA after the 2012 presidential election among individuals who supported the losing candidate

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Published date: 2014
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 380041
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380041
ISSN: 0197-3533
PURE UUID: 17e727db-b246-49a8-b754-6edea1bd6bbe

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Date deposited: 28 Aug 2015 15:09
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 21:10

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Contributors

Author: Christina Roylance
Author: Andrew Abeyta
Author: Clay Routledge
Author: Jacob Juhl

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