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Pattern recognition receptors in microbial keratitis.

Pattern recognition receptors in microbial keratitis.
Pattern recognition receptors in microbial keratitis.
Microbial keratitis is a significant cause of global visual impairment and blindness. Corneal infection can be caused by a wide variety of pathogens, each of which exhibits a range of mechanisms by which the immune system is activated. The complexity of the immune response to corneal infection is only now beginning to be elucidated. Crucial to the cornea's defences are the pattern-recognition receptors: Toll-like and Nod-like receptors and the subsequent activation of inflammatory pathways. These inflammatory pathways include the inflammasome and can lead to significant tissue destruction and corneal damage, with the potential for resultant blindness. Understanding the immune mechanisms behind this tissue destruction may enable improved identification of therapeutic targets to aid development of more specific therapies for reducing corneal damage in infectious keratitis. This review summarises current knowledge of pattern-recognition receptors and their downstream pathways in response to the major keratitis-causing organisms and alludes to potential therapeutic approaches that could alleviate corneal blindness
0950-222X
Taube, M.A.
9c7261e6-a53c-423c-8cd2-bfa43ab142bd
Del Mar Cendra, M.
f5a203b8-3973-48a2-b9ff-7960b6fad056
Elsahn, A.
6811c298-5265-44e7-a521-d77310638233
Christodoulides, Myron
eba99148-620c-452a-a334-c1a52ba94078
Hossain, Parwez
563de5fc-84ad-4539-9228-bde0237eaf51
Taube, M.A.
9c7261e6-a53c-423c-8cd2-bfa43ab142bd
Del Mar Cendra, M.
f5a203b8-3973-48a2-b9ff-7960b6fad056
Elsahn, A.
6811c298-5265-44e7-a521-d77310638233
Christodoulides, Myron
eba99148-620c-452a-a334-c1a52ba94078
Hossain, Parwez
563de5fc-84ad-4539-9228-bde0237eaf51

Taube, M.A., Del Mar Cendra, M., Elsahn, A., Christodoulides, Myron and Hossain, Parwez (2015) Pattern recognition receptors in microbial keratitis. Eye. (doi:10.1038/eye.2015.118). (PMID:26160532)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Microbial keratitis is a significant cause of global visual impairment and blindness. Corneal infection can be caused by a wide variety of pathogens, each of which exhibits a range of mechanisms by which the immune system is activated. The complexity of the immune response to corneal infection is only now beginning to be elucidated. Crucial to the cornea's defences are the pattern-recognition receptors: Toll-like and Nod-like receptors and the subsequent activation of inflammatory pathways. These inflammatory pathways include the inflammasome and can lead to significant tissue destruction and corneal damage, with the potential for resultant blindness. Understanding the immune mechanisms behind this tissue destruction may enable improved identification of therapeutic targets to aid development of more specific therapies for reducing corneal damage in infectious keratitis. This review summarises current knowledge of pattern-recognition receptors and their downstream pathways in response to the major keratitis-causing organisms and alludes to potential therapeutic approaches that could alleviate corneal blindness

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More information

Published date: 10 July 2015
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 380128
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380128
ISSN: 0950-222X
PURE UUID: 959a445b-7b92-4153-b9c9-3389fbef70a9
ORCID for Parwez Hossain: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3131-2395

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Sep 2015 08:38
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:41

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