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Perfectionism related to self-reported insomnia severity, but not when controlled for stress and emotion regulation

Perfectionism related to self-reported insomnia severity, but not when controlled for stress and emotion regulation
Perfectionism related to self-reported insomnia severity, but not when controlled for stress and emotion regulation
Background: Perfectionism is understood as a set of personality traits such as unrealistically high and rigid standards for performance, fear of failure, and excessive self-criticism. Previous studies showed a direct association between increased perfectionism and poor sleep, though without taking into account possible mediating factors. Here, we tested the hypothesis that perfectionism was directly associated with poor sleep, and that this association collapsed, if mediating factors such as stress and poor emotion regulation were taken into account.
Methods: Three hundred and forty six young adult students (M=23.87 years) completed questionnaires relating to perfectionism traits, sleep, and psychological functioning such as stress perception, coping with stress, emotion regulation, and mental toughness.
Results: Perfectionism was directly associated with poor sleep and poor psychological functioning. When stress, poor coping, and poor emotion regulation were entered in the equation, perfectionism traits no longer contributed substantively to the explanation of poor sleep.
Conclusion: Though perfectionism traits seem associated with poor sleep, the direct role of such traits seemed small, when mediating factors such as stress perception and emotion regulation were taken into account.
perfectionism, perceived stress, emotion regulation, young adults, sleep quality
1176-6328
263-271
Brand, Serge
23eb5581-2f46-4a52-a875-742acbd52550
Kirov, Roumen
c3bff1bb-e545-4192-9c71-89711dc586a3
Kalak, Nadeem
98179a53-169e-468a-88d5-819539435d98
Gerber, Markus
dda99513-51d0-4131-b328-b19a9b89aa6d
Pühse, Uwe
4e336349-0050-4dec-93df-d2e9afb31178
Lemola, Sakari
ab411d45-007b-4fcc-8341-540e591293ff
Correll, Christoph
88d23202-4b2b-4fab-ab83-d92305cd3c3e
Cortese, Samuele
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Meyer, Till
2ff3a8df-810e-44cc-966a-6dc8f23baca1
Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith
55fab024-8230-415b-884c-f3815f050165
Brand, Serge
23eb5581-2f46-4a52-a875-742acbd52550
Kirov, Roumen
c3bff1bb-e545-4192-9c71-89711dc586a3
Kalak, Nadeem
98179a53-169e-468a-88d5-819539435d98
Gerber, Markus
dda99513-51d0-4131-b328-b19a9b89aa6d
Pühse, Uwe
4e336349-0050-4dec-93df-d2e9afb31178
Lemola, Sakari
ab411d45-007b-4fcc-8341-540e591293ff
Correll, Christoph
88d23202-4b2b-4fab-ab83-d92305cd3c3e
Cortese, Samuele
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Meyer, Till
2ff3a8df-810e-44cc-966a-6dc8f23baca1
Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith
55fab024-8230-415b-884c-f3815f050165

Brand, Serge, Kirov, Roumen, Kalak, Nadeem, Gerber, Markus, Pühse, Uwe, Lemola, Sakari, Correll, Christoph, Cortese, Samuele, Meyer, Till and Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith (2015) Perfectionism related to self-reported insomnia severity, but not when controlled for stress and emotion regulation. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 263-271. (doi:10.2147/NDT.S74905).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Perfectionism is understood as a set of personality traits such as unrealistically high and rigid standards for performance, fear of failure, and excessive self-criticism. Previous studies showed a direct association between increased perfectionism and poor sleep, though without taking into account possible mediating factors. Here, we tested the hypothesis that perfectionism was directly associated with poor sleep, and that this association collapsed, if mediating factors such as stress and poor emotion regulation were taken into account.
Methods: Three hundred and forty six young adult students (M=23.87 years) completed questionnaires relating to perfectionism traits, sleep, and psychological functioning such as stress perception, coping with stress, emotion regulation, and mental toughness.
Results: Perfectionism was directly associated with poor sleep and poor psychological functioning. When stress, poor coping, and poor emotion regulation were entered in the equation, perfectionism traits no longer contributed substantively to the explanation of poor sleep.
Conclusion: Though perfectionism traits seem associated with poor sleep, the direct role of such traits seemed small, when mediating factors such as stress perception and emotion regulation were taken into account.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 14 November 2014
Published date: 3 February 2015
Keywords: perfectionism, perceived stress, emotion regulation, young adults, sleep quality
Organisations: Clinical Neuroscience

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 380135
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380135
ISSN: 1176-6328
PURE UUID: 26115e01-ada6-4d92-850a-749e2b97c260
ORCID for Samuele Cortese: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5877-8075

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Aug 2015 13:39
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:21

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