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Does psychostimulant treatment in children with ADHD increase later risk of substance use disorder?

Does psychostimulant treatment in children with ADHD increase later risk of substance use disorder?
Does psychostimulant treatment in children with ADHD increase later risk of substance use disorder?
Psychostimulants are the first choice medication in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite the proven high efficacy of psychostimulants, at least in the short term, for ADHD core symptoms, concerns continue to be raised on their adverse effects, including putative increased risk of substance use disorders (SUDs). A recent multicentre, case–control, longitudinal, prospective, European study by Groenman and colleagues found that treatment with psychostimulants in children with ADHD lowered the risk of SUDs in adolescence. However, this finding is at odds with other recent evidence concluding that ADHD children with and without medication treatment history did not significantly differ on any subsequent SUDs rates. In the present paper, we discuss the study by Groenman and colleagues in view of its methodological strengths and limitations, and we suggest possible implications for day-to-day clinical practice.
adolescents, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, children, psychostimulants, substance use disorder
2045-7960
133-135
Purgato, M.
c9d151c2-b4f1-452e-b13c-5adee3114ac8
Cortese, S.
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Purgato, M.
c9d151c2-b4f1-452e-b13c-5adee3114ac8
Cortese, S.
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb

Purgato, M. and Cortese, S. (2014) Does psychostimulant treatment in children with ADHD increase later risk of substance use disorder? Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences, 23 (2), 133-135. (doi:10.1017/s2045796014000146).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Psychostimulants are the first choice medication in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite the proven high efficacy of psychostimulants, at least in the short term, for ADHD core symptoms, concerns continue to be raised on their adverse effects, including putative increased risk of substance use disorders (SUDs). A recent multicentre, case–control, longitudinal, prospective, European study by Groenman and colleagues found that treatment with psychostimulants in children with ADHD lowered the risk of SUDs in adolescence. However, this finding is at odds with other recent evidence concluding that ADHD children with and without medication treatment history did not significantly differ on any subsequent SUDs rates. In the present paper, we discuss the study by Groenman and colleagues in view of its methodological strengths and limitations, and we suggest possible implications for day-to-day clinical practice.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 7 February 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 March 2014
Published date: June 2014
Keywords: adolescents, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, children, psychostimulants, substance use disorder
Organisations: Clinical Neuroscience

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 380161
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380161
ISSN: 2045-7960
PURE UUID: 2a4e214d-a43d-4a75-b02f-25de6f0e90f3
ORCID for S. Cortese: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5877-8075

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Aug 2015 14:40
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:35

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Contributors

Author: M. Purgato
Author: S. Cortese ORCID iD

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