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Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and impairment in executive functions: a barrier to weight loss in individuals with obesity?

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and impairment in executive functions: a barrier to weight loss in individuals with obesity?
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and impairment in executive functions: a barrier to weight loss in individuals with obesity?
Background
An increasing body of research points to a significant association of obesity to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and deficits in executive functions. There is also preliminary evidence suggesting that children with ADHD may be at risk of obesity in adulthood.

Discussion
In this article, we discuss the evidence showing that ADHD and/or deficits in executive functions are a barrier to a successful weight control in individuals enrolled in weight loss programs. Impairing symptoms of ADHD or deficits in executive functions may foster dysregulated eating behaviors, such as binge eating, emotionally-induced eating or eating in the absence of hunger, which, in turn, may contribute to unsuccessful weight loss. ADHD-related behaviors or neurocognitive impairment may also hamper a regular and structured physical activity. There is initial research showing that treatment of comorbid ADHD and executive functions training significantly improve the outcome of obesity in individuals with comorbid ADHD or impairment in executive functions.

Summary
Preliminary evidence suggests that comorbid ADHD and deficits in executive functions are a barrier to a successful weight loss in individuals involved in obesity treatment programs. If further methodologically sound evidence confirms this relationship, screening and effectively managing comorbid ADHD and/or executive functions deficits in individuals with obesity might have the potential to reduce not only the burden of ADHD but also the obesity epidemics.

ADHD, executive functions, obesity, treatment resistance
1471-244X
286
Cortese, Samuele
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Comencini, Erika
2734f70a-b64b-437e-83ed-3d0fd579af57
Vincenzi, Brenda
6cf59f67-ef21-439e-9d01-8a551b4721cb
Speranza, Mario
cab43d57-ac56-422f-a8c2-404eda2ff4dc
Angriman, Marco
3520e752-d35c-461f-80f4-b31203319cef
Cortese, Samuele
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Comencini, Erika
2734f70a-b64b-437e-83ed-3d0fd579af57
Vincenzi, Brenda
6cf59f67-ef21-439e-9d01-8a551b4721cb
Speranza, Mario
cab43d57-ac56-422f-a8c2-404eda2ff4dc
Angriman, Marco
3520e752-d35c-461f-80f4-b31203319cef

Cortese, Samuele, Comencini, Erika, Vincenzi, Brenda, Speranza, Mario and Angriman, Marco (2013) Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and impairment in executive functions: a barrier to weight loss in individuals with obesity? BMC Psychiatry, 13 (1), 286. (doi:10.1186/1471-244x-13-286).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background
An increasing body of research points to a significant association of obesity to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and deficits in executive functions. There is also preliminary evidence suggesting that children with ADHD may be at risk of obesity in adulthood.

Discussion
In this article, we discuss the evidence showing that ADHD and/or deficits in executive functions are a barrier to a successful weight control in individuals enrolled in weight loss programs. Impairing symptoms of ADHD or deficits in executive functions may foster dysregulated eating behaviors, such as binge eating, emotionally-induced eating or eating in the absence of hunger, which, in turn, may contribute to unsuccessful weight loss. ADHD-related behaviors or neurocognitive impairment may also hamper a regular and structured physical activity. There is initial research showing that treatment of comorbid ADHD and executive functions training significantly improve the outcome of obesity in individuals with comorbid ADHD or impairment in executive functions.

Summary
Preliminary evidence suggests that comorbid ADHD and deficits in executive functions are a barrier to a successful weight loss in individuals involved in obesity treatment programs. If further methodologically sound evidence confirms this relationship, screening and effectively managing comorbid ADHD and/or executive functions deficits in individuals with obesity might have the potential to reduce not only the burden of ADHD but also the obesity epidemics.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 July 2013
Published date: 7 November 2013
Keywords: ADHD, executive functions, obesity, treatment resistance
Organisations: Clinical Neuroscience

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 380189
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380189
ISSN: 1471-244X
PURE UUID: 5a00200b-f4a7-49ee-964b-1b146c36fc4a
ORCID for Samuele Cortese: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5877-8075

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Aug 2015 13:00
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:35

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Contributors

Author: Samuele Cortese ORCID iD
Author: Erika Comencini
Author: Brenda Vincenzi
Author: Mario Speranza
Author: Marco Angriman

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