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Adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and obesity: epidemiological study

Adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and obesity: epidemiological study
Adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and obesity: epidemiological study
A significant association between attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obesity has been reported. This study addresses unexplored aspects of this relationship.

Aims
To evaluate the association between adult obesity and: (a) persistent, remitted or lifetime ADHD; (b) number of childhood ADHD symptoms, controlling for socioeconomic status and mood, anxiety and substance use disorders.

Method

Face-to-face psychiatric interviews in 34 653 US adults from the National Epidemiologic Study on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Obesity was defined as a body mass index ?30.

Results

Persistent, lifetime or remitted ADHD were not associated with obesity after controlling for confounders. The number of childhood ADHD symptoms was significantly associated with adult obesity, even after adjustment, in women.

Conclusions
Childhood ADHD symptoms are associated with obesity in women even after comorbid psychiatric disorders are accounted for. This provides a rationale for longitudinal studies assessing the impact of the treatment of childhood ADHD symptoms on obesity in women.
0007-1250
24-34
Cortese, S.
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Faraone, S. V.
60d855ed-a8a8-4eca-9e62-965eb021b1e2
Bernardi, S.
57027b80-7dc3-45c1-ad12-4c18a7d9322a
Wang, S.
a2223997-9f42-425b-b0c6-1bcb64d9b8fc
Blanco, C.
0640df32-7208-4c5a-ac04-0565d39d7801
Cortese, S.
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Faraone, S. V.
60d855ed-a8a8-4eca-9e62-965eb021b1e2
Bernardi, S.
57027b80-7dc3-45c1-ad12-4c18a7d9322a
Wang, S.
a2223997-9f42-425b-b0c6-1bcb64d9b8fc
Blanco, C.
0640df32-7208-4c5a-ac04-0565d39d7801

Cortese, S., Faraone, S. V., Bernardi, S., Wang, S. and Blanco, C. (2013) Adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and obesity: epidemiological study. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 203 (1), 24-34. (doi:10.1192/bjp.bp.112.123299).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A significant association between attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obesity has been reported. This study addresses unexplored aspects of this relationship.

Aims
To evaluate the association between adult obesity and: (a) persistent, remitted or lifetime ADHD; (b) number of childhood ADHD symptoms, controlling for socioeconomic status and mood, anxiety and substance use disorders.

Method

Face-to-face psychiatric interviews in 34 653 US adults from the National Epidemiologic Study on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Obesity was defined as a body mass index ?30.

Results

Persistent, lifetime or remitted ADHD were not associated with obesity after controlling for confounders. The number of childhood ADHD symptoms was significantly associated with adult obesity, even after adjustment, in women.

Conclusions
Childhood ADHD symptoms are associated with obesity in women even after comorbid psychiatric disorders are accounted for. This provides a rationale for longitudinal studies assessing the impact of the treatment of childhood ADHD symptoms on obesity in women.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: July 2013
Organisations: Clinical Neuroscience

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 380190
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380190
ISSN: 0007-1250
PURE UUID: 503c0d0b-a748-47b9-a4b9-34be5f05e674
ORCID for S. Cortese: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5877-8075

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Aug 2015 09:22
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 20:37

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