The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Practitioner Review: Current best practice in the management of adverse events during treatment with ADHD medications in children and adolescents

Practitioner Review: Current best practice in the management of adverse events during treatment with ADHD medications in children and adolescents
Practitioner Review: Current best practice in the management of adverse events during treatment with ADHD medications in children and adolescents
Background:? Medication is an important element of therapeutic strategies for ADHD. While medications for ADHD are generally well-tolerated, there are common, although less severe, as well as rare but severe adverse events AEs during treatment with ADHD drugs. The aim of this review is to provide evidence- and expert-based guidance concerning the management of (AEs) with medications for ADHD.

Methods:? For ease of use by practitioners and clinicians, the article is organized in a simple question and answer format regarding the prevalence and management of the most common AEs. Answers were based on empirical evidence from studies (preferably meta-analyses or systematic reviews) retrieved in PubMed, Ovid, EMBASE and Web of Knowledge through 30 June 2012. When no empirical evidence was available, expert consensus of the members of the European ADHD Guidelines Group is provided. The evidence-level of the management recommendations was based on the SIGN grading system.

Results:? The review covers monitoring and management strategies of loss of appetite and growth delay, cardiovascular risks, sleep disturbance, tics, substance misuse/abuse, seizures, suicidal thoughts/behaviours and psychotic symptoms.

Conclusion:? Most AEs during treatment with drugs for ADHD are manageable and most of the times it is not necessary to stop medication, so that patients with ADHD may continue to benefit from the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment.
ADHD, medication, adverse events, management, recommendations, European
0021-9630
227-246
Cortese, Samuele
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Holtmann, Martin
511fa11b-f2cb-413f-880e-50c3b04ad9d3
Banaschewski, Tobias
4627c589-04cc-4f5b-ac2d-05f547f63dfd
Buitelaar, Jan
0a7a93a0-884f-4fe1-9cd8-6c9f9c5df4da
Coghill, David
deea8957-fdfc-488a-a3bb-fb9b536c7172
Danckaerts, Marina
e7e7618b-6dd0-4520-bf4e-865597928758
Dittmann, Ralf W.
e2d36a60-d6c5-485d-8ce5-852d5a1b9bfd
Graham, John
ff2b82fa-513c-4965-ad77-a38bb0251752
Taylor, Eric
0df56dc7-9553-44e2-9594-612d758f8684
Sergeant, Joseph
9d13c879-0b3b-45df-8ba7-3978ca029ac5
Cortese, Samuele
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Holtmann, Martin
511fa11b-f2cb-413f-880e-50c3b04ad9d3
Banaschewski, Tobias
4627c589-04cc-4f5b-ac2d-05f547f63dfd
Buitelaar, Jan
0a7a93a0-884f-4fe1-9cd8-6c9f9c5df4da
Coghill, David
deea8957-fdfc-488a-a3bb-fb9b536c7172
Danckaerts, Marina
e7e7618b-6dd0-4520-bf4e-865597928758
Dittmann, Ralf W.
e2d36a60-d6c5-485d-8ce5-852d5a1b9bfd
Graham, John
ff2b82fa-513c-4965-ad77-a38bb0251752
Taylor, Eric
0df56dc7-9553-44e2-9594-612d758f8684
Sergeant, Joseph
9d13c879-0b3b-45df-8ba7-3978ca029ac5

Cortese, Samuele, Holtmann, Martin, Banaschewski, Tobias, Buitelaar, Jan, Coghill, David, Danckaerts, Marina, Dittmann, Ralf W., Graham, John, Taylor, Eric and Sergeant, Joseph (2013) Practitioner Review: Current best practice in the management of adverse events during treatment with ADHD medications in children and adolescents. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 54 (3), 227-246. (doi:10.1111/jcpp.12036).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background:? Medication is an important element of therapeutic strategies for ADHD. While medications for ADHD are generally well-tolerated, there are common, although less severe, as well as rare but severe adverse events AEs during treatment with ADHD drugs. The aim of this review is to provide evidence- and expert-based guidance concerning the management of (AEs) with medications for ADHD.

Methods:? For ease of use by practitioners and clinicians, the article is organized in a simple question and answer format regarding the prevalence and management of the most common AEs. Answers were based on empirical evidence from studies (preferably meta-analyses or systematic reviews) retrieved in PubMed, Ovid, EMBASE and Web of Knowledge through 30 June 2012. When no empirical evidence was available, expert consensus of the members of the European ADHD Guidelines Group is provided. The evidence-level of the management recommendations was based on the SIGN grading system.

Results:? The review covers monitoring and management strategies of loss of appetite and growth delay, cardiovascular risks, sleep disturbance, tics, substance misuse/abuse, seizures, suicidal thoughts/behaviours and psychotic symptoms.

Conclusion:? Most AEs during treatment with drugs for ADHD are manageable and most of the times it is not necessary to stop medication, so that patients with ADHD may continue to benefit from the effectiveness of pharmacological treatment.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 7 January 2013
Keywords: ADHD, medication, adverse events, management, recommendations, European
Organisations: Clinical Neuroscience

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 380191
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380191
ISSN: 0021-9630
PURE UUID: b1295d49-3b82-4cf3-bae1-3e972f95148d
ORCID for Samuele Cortese: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5877-8075

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Aug 2015 15:42
Last modified: 17 Sep 2019 00:37

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×