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Poor monitoring of physical health in patients referred to a mood disorders service

Poor monitoring of physical health in patients referred to a mood disorders service
Poor monitoring of physical health in patients referred to a mood disorders service
Background: severe mental illness is associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality, most commonly from cardiovascular disease. Much of the risk is explicable by potentially modifiable factors such as diabetes and dyslipidaemia, and regular screening of patients with severe mental illness is recommended. Screening and intervention for physical illness among people with schizophrenia is often suboptimal, but little is known about monitoring physical health in patients with affective (mood and anxiety) disorders.

Method: electronic and paper records were examined for evidence of monitoring of cardiovascular disease risk factors in the 12 months prior to assessment in patients attending a tertiary referral specialist service for affective disorders over a period of 39 months. The number of contacts with healthcare services was calculated for each patient to provide an estimate of the opportunities for monitoring.

Results: notes for 113 patients were examined. The mean number of contacts with outpatient services in the 12 months before assessment was 6.9 (standard deviation 7.7). Documented evidence of physical-health monitoring was seen in only 29 patients: monitoring was more commonly undertaken in patients with recurrent unipolar depression and in those who had undergone recent inpatient treatment. Contacts that could have allowed monitoring of physical health were common.

Discussion: although most patients had multiple contacts with health services in the 12-month period before their assessment in the service, there was little evidence of use of primary-prevention measures to reduce the risks of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this vulnerable population
2045-1253
22-25
Lack, D.
f69a38e3-cde1-4fa7-856c-ff8147006876
Holt, R.I.G.
d54202e1-fcf6-4a17-a320-9f32d7024393
Baldwin, D.S.
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
Lack, D.
f69a38e3-cde1-4fa7-856c-ff8147006876
Holt, R.I.G.
d54202e1-fcf6-4a17-a320-9f32d7024393
Baldwin, D.S.
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e

Lack, D., Holt, R.I.G. and Baldwin, D.S. (2015) Poor monitoring of physical health in patients referred to a mood disorders service. Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology, 5 (1), 22-25. (doi:10.1177/2045125314560734).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: severe mental illness is associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality, most commonly from cardiovascular disease. Much of the risk is explicable by potentially modifiable factors such as diabetes and dyslipidaemia, and regular screening of patients with severe mental illness is recommended. Screening and intervention for physical illness among people with schizophrenia is often suboptimal, but little is known about monitoring physical health in patients with affective (mood and anxiety) disorders.

Method: electronic and paper records were examined for evidence of monitoring of cardiovascular disease risk factors in the 12 months prior to assessment in patients attending a tertiary referral specialist service for affective disorders over a period of 39 months. The number of contacts with healthcare services was calculated for each patient to provide an estimate of the opportunities for monitoring.

Results: notes for 113 patients were examined. The mean number of contacts with outpatient services in the 12 months before assessment was 6.9 (standard deviation 7.7). Documented evidence of physical-health monitoring was seen in only 29 patients: monitoring was more commonly undertaken in patients with recurrent unipolar depression and in those who had undergone recent inpatient treatment. Contacts that could have allowed monitoring of physical health were common.

Discussion: although most patients had multiple contacts with health services in the 12-month period before their assessment in the service, there was little evidence of use of primary-prevention measures to reduce the risks of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this vulnerable population

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More information

Published date: February 2015
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 380214
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380214
ISSN: 2045-1253
PURE UUID: 006b20aa-b014-4515-a1b2-482a21ab665f
ORCID for R.I.G. Holt: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8911-6744
ORCID for D.S. Baldwin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3343-0907

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Sep 2015 10:58
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:56

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Contributors

Author: D. Lack
Author: R.I.G. Holt ORCID iD
Author: D.S. Baldwin ORCID iD

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