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Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors

Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors
Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors
Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman [“A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions,” J. Phys. Chem.60, 1375–1378 (1956)]10.1021/j150544a010 on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods
0021-9606
84102
Boon, N.J.
faac419d-e68a-464c-93ff-bbdc1261cdea
Hoyle, R.B.
e980d6a8-b750-491b-be13-84d695f8b8a1
Boon, N.J.
faac419d-e68a-464c-93ff-bbdc1261cdea
Hoyle, R.B.
e980d6a8-b750-491b-be13-84d695f8b8a1

Boon, N.J. and Hoyle, R.B. (2012) Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors. The Journal of Chemical Physics, 137 (8), 84102. (doi:10.1063/1.4746392).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman [“A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions,” J. Phys. Chem.60, 1375–1378 (1956)]10.1021/j150544a010 on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods

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1.4746392.pdf_expires=1439201217&id=id&accname=2103930&checksum=BD59EB3EC76C9C0B1C99DAB775D233D9 - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 2 August 2012
Published date: 23 August 2012
Organisations: Mathematical Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 380221
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380221
ISSN: 0021-9606
PURE UUID: cb901a75-7984-4b93-b12c-3ee35a2d135c
ORCID for R.B. Hoyle: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1645-1071

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Date deposited: 10 Aug 2015 09:54
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:46

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