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The lifetime impact of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)

The lifetime impact of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)
The lifetime impact of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)
Background The aim of the study was to present nationally representative data on the lifetime independent association between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and psychiatric co-morbidity, correlates, quality of life and treatment seeking in the USA.

Method Data were derived from a large national sample of the US population. Face-to-face surveys of more than 34 000 adults aged 18 years and older residing in households were conducted during the 2004–2005 period. Diagnoses of ADHD, Axis I and II disorders were based on the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV version.

Results ADHD was associated independently of the effects of other psychiatric co-morbidity with increased risk of bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, specific phobia, and narcissistic, histrionic, borderline, antisocial and schizotypal personality disorders. A lifetime history of ADHD was also associated with increased risk of engaging in behaviors reflecting lack of planning and deficient inhibitory control, with high rates of adverse events, lower perceived health, social support and higher perceived stress. Fewer than half of individuals with ADHD had ever sought treatment, and about one-quarter had ever received medication. The average age of first treatment contact was 18.40 years.

Conclusions ADHD is common and associated with a broad range of psychiatric disorders, impulsive behaviors, greater number of traumas, lower quality of life, perceived social support and social functioning, even after adjusting for additional co-morbidity. When treatment is sought, it is often in late adolescence or early adulthood, suggesting the need to improve diagnosis and treatment of ADHD.
ADHD, adult, epidemiology, NESARC, treatment
0033-2917
875-887
Bernardi, S.
57027b80-7dc3-45c1-ad12-4c18a7d9322a
Faraone, S. V.
60d855ed-a8a8-4eca-9e62-965eb021b1e2
Cortese, S.
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Kerridge, B. T.
dc5e58f7-5d08-444a-a7fd-eb6b56fac1d3
Pallanti, S.
4aec04d9-7f22-407d-b7f9-2aef98f0cc11
Wang, S.
a2223997-9f42-425b-b0c6-1bcb64d9b8fc
Blanco, C.
0640df32-7208-4c5a-ac04-0565d39d7801
Bernardi, S.
57027b80-7dc3-45c1-ad12-4c18a7d9322a
Faraone, S. V.
60d855ed-a8a8-4eca-9e62-965eb021b1e2
Cortese, S.
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Kerridge, B. T.
dc5e58f7-5d08-444a-a7fd-eb6b56fac1d3
Pallanti, S.
4aec04d9-7f22-407d-b7f9-2aef98f0cc11
Wang, S.
a2223997-9f42-425b-b0c6-1bcb64d9b8fc
Blanco, C.
0640df32-7208-4c5a-ac04-0565d39d7801

Bernardi, S., Faraone, S. V., Cortese, S., Kerridge, B. T., Pallanti, S., Wang, S. and Blanco, C. (2011) The lifetime impact of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Psychological Medicine, 42 (4), 875-887. (doi:10.1017/s003329171100153x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background The aim of the study was to present nationally representative data on the lifetime independent association between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and psychiatric co-morbidity, correlates, quality of life and treatment seeking in the USA.

Method Data were derived from a large national sample of the US population. Face-to-face surveys of more than 34 000 adults aged 18 years and older residing in households were conducted during the 2004–2005 period. Diagnoses of ADHD, Axis I and II disorders were based on the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV version.

Results ADHD was associated independently of the effects of other psychiatric co-morbidity with increased risk of bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, specific phobia, and narcissistic, histrionic, borderline, antisocial and schizotypal personality disorders. A lifetime history of ADHD was also associated with increased risk of engaging in behaviors reflecting lack of planning and deficient inhibitory control, with high rates of adverse events, lower perceived health, social support and higher perceived stress. Fewer than half of individuals with ADHD had ever sought treatment, and about one-quarter had ever received medication. The average age of first treatment contact was 18.40 years.

Conclusions ADHD is common and associated with a broad range of psychiatric disorders, impulsive behaviors, greater number of traumas, lower quality of life, perceived social support and social functioning, even after adjusting for additional co-morbidity. When treatment is sought, it is often in late adolescence or early adulthood, suggesting the need to improve diagnosis and treatment of ADHD.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 July 2011
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 August 2011
Keywords: ADHD, adult, epidemiology, NESARC, treatment
Organisations: Clinical Neuroscience

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 380400
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380400
ISSN: 0033-2917
PURE UUID: 69aed6d7-315e-4525-9ea1-cc62a6272461
ORCID for S. Cortese: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5877-8075

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Aug 2015 15:06
Last modified: 18 Jul 2019 00:34

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