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Sleep disturbances and serum ferritin levels in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Sleep disturbances and serum ferritin levels in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
Sleep disturbances and serum ferritin levels in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
Background: a subset of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may present with impairing sleep disturbances. While preliminary evidence suggests that iron deficiency might be involved into the pathophysiology of daytime ADHD symptoms, no research has been conducted to explore the relationship between iron deficiency and sleep disturbances in patients with ADHD. The aim of this study was to assess the association between serum ferritin levels and parent reports of sleep disturbances in a sample of children with ADHD.

Methods: subjects: sixty-eight consecutively referred children (6–14 years) with ADHD diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria using the semi-structured interview Kiddie-SADS-PL. Measures: parents filled out the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC) and the Conners Parent Rating Scale (CPRS). Serum ferritin levels were determined using the Tinaquant method.

Results: compared to children with serum ferritin levels ?45 µg/l, those with serum ferritin levels <45 µg/l had significantly higher scores on the SDSC subscale “Sleep wake transition disorders” (SWTD) (P = 0.042), which includes items on abnormal movements in sleep, as well as significantly higher scores on the CPRS–ADHD index (P = 0.034). The mean scores on the other SDSC subscales did not significantly differ between children with serum ferritin ?45 and <45 µg/l. Serum ferritin levels were inversely correlated to SWTD scores (P = 0.043).

Conclusion: serum ferritin levels <45 µg/l might indicate a risk for sleep wake transition disorders, including abnormal sleep movements, in children with ADHD. Our results based on questionnaires set the basis for further actigraphic and polysomnographic studies on nighttime activity and iron deficiency in ADHD. Research in this field may suggest future trials of iron supplementation (possibly in association with ADHD medications) for abnormal sleep motor activity in children with ADHD
1018-8827
393-399
Cortese, Samuele
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Konofal, Eric
6328bf1a-74f1-4438-8c14-333ccc8931eb
Bernardina, Bernardo Dalla
5325874e-719c-4763-8a4a-f9ffe2288e12
Mouren, Marie-Christine
9c60d8ab-fe73-4121-91a8-4522492cd6d5
Lecendreux, Michel
51135545-1b33-4540-8ba9-1e8a1cc57173
Cortese, Samuele
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Konofal, Eric
6328bf1a-74f1-4438-8c14-333ccc8931eb
Bernardina, Bernardo Dalla
5325874e-719c-4763-8a4a-f9ffe2288e12
Mouren, Marie-Christine
9c60d8ab-fe73-4121-91a8-4522492cd6d5
Lecendreux, Michel
51135545-1b33-4540-8ba9-1e8a1cc57173

Cortese, Samuele, Konofal, Eric, Bernardina, Bernardo Dalla, Mouren, Marie-Christine and Lecendreux, Michel (2009) Sleep disturbances and serum ferritin levels in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 18 (7), 393-399. (doi:10.1007/s00787-009-0746-8). (PMID:19205783)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: a subset of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may present with impairing sleep disturbances. While preliminary evidence suggests that iron deficiency might be involved into the pathophysiology of daytime ADHD symptoms, no research has been conducted to explore the relationship between iron deficiency and sleep disturbances in patients with ADHD. The aim of this study was to assess the association between serum ferritin levels and parent reports of sleep disturbances in a sample of children with ADHD.

Methods: subjects: sixty-eight consecutively referred children (6–14 years) with ADHD diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria using the semi-structured interview Kiddie-SADS-PL. Measures: parents filled out the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC) and the Conners Parent Rating Scale (CPRS). Serum ferritin levels were determined using the Tinaquant method.

Results: compared to children with serum ferritin levels ?45 µg/l, those with serum ferritin levels <45 µg/l had significantly higher scores on the SDSC subscale “Sleep wake transition disorders” (SWTD) (P = 0.042), which includes items on abnormal movements in sleep, as well as significantly higher scores on the CPRS–ADHD index (P = 0.034). The mean scores on the other SDSC subscales did not significantly differ between children with serum ferritin ?45 and <45 µg/l. Serum ferritin levels were inversely correlated to SWTD scores (P = 0.043).

Conclusion: serum ferritin levels <45 µg/l might indicate a risk for sleep wake transition disorders, including abnormal sleep movements, in children with ADHD. Our results based on questionnaires set the basis for further actigraphic and polysomnographic studies on nighttime activity and iron deficiency in ADHD. Research in this field may suggest future trials of iron supplementation (possibly in association with ADHD medications) for abnormal sleep motor activity in children with ADHD

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Published date: July 2009
Organisations: Clinical Neuroscience

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 380446
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380446
ISSN: 1018-8827
PURE UUID: 8e7a6118-a7b9-4762-8ccf-d371c7d59965
ORCID for Samuele Cortese: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5877-8075

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Date deposited: 10 Sep 2015 10:14
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 01:33

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