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Light capture

Light capture
Light capture
The efficient capture of light is an essential factor for consideration in all solar cell designs. This chapter explores antireflective and light trapping schemes designed to reduce optical losses in solar cells with the aim of improving device efficiency. After a survey of the different mechanisms available for antireflection and light trapping, the various schemes employing these mechanisms are described. This begins with the traditional methods of thin film antireflective coatings and large (micron) scale texturing before moving onto more recent developments in the use of subwavelength texturing, taking inspiration from natural ‘moth-eye’ antireflective surfaces. Finally, the rapidly emerging field of plasmonics for photovoltaics is explored in which metal nanoparticles scatter incoming light through the generation of localized surface plasmons. In each section, the simulation techniques used for design optimization are introduced and methods for experimental realization and implementation in a range of photovoltaic devices are described. The associated increases in cost and complexity conferred to the solar cell fabrication process are also considered because these are the main hindrances to wide scale adoption of new strategies of light capture
978-1-84973-187-4
247-296
Royal Society of Chemistry
Boden, Stuart A.
83976b65-e90f-42d1-9a01-fe9cfc571bf8
Temple, Tristan L.
8f71e243-a483-454c-bf9a-bee866a7692d
Irvine, Stuart J.C.
Boden, Stuart A.
83976b65-e90f-42d1-9a01-fe9cfc571bf8
Temple, Tristan L.
8f71e243-a483-454c-bf9a-bee866a7692d
Irvine, Stuart J.C.

Boden, Stuart A. and Temple, Tristan L. (2014) Light capture. In, Irvine, Stuart J.C. (ed.) Materials Challenges: Inorganic Photovoltaic Solar Energy. (RSC Energy and Environment Series, , (doi:10.1039/9781849733465-00247), 12) London, GB. Royal Society of Chemistry, pp. 247-296. (doi:10.1039/9781849733465-00247).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The efficient capture of light is an essential factor for consideration in all solar cell designs. This chapter explores antireflective and light trapping schemes designed to reduce optical losses in solar cells with the aim of improving device efficiency. After a survey of the different mechanisms available for antireflection and light trapping, the various schemes employing these mechanisms are described. This begins with the traditional methods of thin film antireflective coatings and large (micron) scale texturing before moving onto more recent developments in the use of subwavelength texturing, taking inspiration from natural ‘moth-eye’ antireflective surfaces. Finally, the rapidly emerging field of plasmonics for photovoltaics is explored in which metal nanoparticles scatter incoming light through the generation of localized surface plasmons. In each section, the simulation techniques used for design optimization are introduced and methods for experimental realization and implementation in a range of photovoltaic devices are described. The associated increases in cost and complexity conferred to the solar cell fabrication process are also considered because these are the main hindrances to wide scale adoption of new strategies of light capture

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More information

Published date: 9 December 2014
Organisations: Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 380510
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380510
ISBN: 978-1-84973-187-4
PURE UUID: 9a7bb11a-6445-40e3-8d37-91d56469845b
ORCID for Stuart A. Boden: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4232-1828

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Sep 2015 11:01
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:43

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