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Putting the materials back into virtual archaeology

Putting the materials back into virtual archaeology
Putting the materials back into virtual archaeology
At its core, the discipline of archaeology is the study of past material culture, or the so-called archaeological record. The term "archaeological record", however, is ambiguous, referring not only to its own physical testimony, but also to the testimony created by archaeologists. As the latter has become increasingly digitalised, our interactions, mediated more and more through screens and seemingly immaterial software, privilege the scopic. I argue that advances in additive manufacturing technology make it possible to reintroduce the kinesthetic elements and enactive content that archaeologist enjoy in the field, and thereby bring about a closer alignment between physical and virtual archaeology.
This paper offers some observations on where and how additive manufacturing technology (e.g. 3d printing) and virtual archaeology have a vital role to play in the development of both archaeological theory and practice
978-5-93572-608-9
12-23
The State Hermitage Publishers
Paul, Reilly
8c89127a-78ed-47cf-8fb5-42758c70e5ee
Paul, Reilly
8c89127a-78ed-47cf-8fb5-42758c70e5ee

Paul, Reilly (2015) Putting the materials back into virtual archaeology. In Virtual Archaeology (Methods and Benefits): Proceedings of the Second International Conference held at State Hermitage Museum, 1-3 June 2015. The State Hermitage Publishers. pp. 12-23 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

At its core, the discipline of archaeology is the study of past material culture, or the so-called archaeological record. The term "archaeological record", however, is ambiguous, referring not only to its own physical testimony, but also to the testimony created by archaeologists. As the latter has become increasingly digitalised, our interactions, mediated more and more through screens and seemingly immaterial software, privilege the scopic. I argue that advances in additive manufacturing technology make it possible to reintroduce the kinesthetic elements and enactive content that archaeologist enjoy in the field, and thereby bring about a closer alignment between physical and virtual archaeology.
This paper offers some observations on where and how additive manufacturing technology (e.g. 3d printing) and virtual archaeology have a vital role to play in the development of both archaeological theory and practice

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More information

Published date: June 2015
Venue - Dates: Second International Conference on Virtual Archaeology, 2015-06-01 - 2015-06-03
Organisations: Archaeology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 380794
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380794
ISBN: 978-5-93572-608-9
PURE UUID: c8f1ca71-4998-4cf3-82bf-082aba8eab7c

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Oct 2015 12:39
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 20:32

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Contributors

Author: Reilly Paul

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