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Epithelial barrier function and immunity in asthma

Epithelial barrier function and immunity in asthma
Epithelial barrier function and immunity in asthma
The bronchial epithelium is constantly exposed to a wide range of environmental materials present in inhaled air, including noxious gases and anthropogenic and natural particulates, such as gas and particles from car emissions, tobacco smoke, pollens, animal dander, and pathogens. As a fully differentiated, pseudostratified mucociliary epithelium, the bronchial epithelium protects the internal milieu of the lung from these agents by forming a physical barrier involving adhesive complexes and a chemical barrier involving secretion of mucus, which traps inhaled particles that can be cleared by the mucociliary escalator. It is a testament to the effectiveness of these two barriers that most environmental challenges are largely overcome without the need to develop an inflammatory response. However, as the initial cell of contact with the environment, the bronchial epithelium also plays a pivotal role in immune surveillance and appropriate activation of immune effector cells and antigen presenting cells in the presence of pathogens or other danger signals. Thus, the bronchial epithelium plays a central role in controlling tissue homeostasis and innate immunity. This review will discuss these barrier properties and how dysregulation of these homeostatic mechanisms can contribute to disease pathologies such as asthma.
2329-6933
S244-S451
Davies, Donna E.
7de8fdc7-3640-4e3a-aa91-d0e03f990c38
Davies, Donna E.
7de8fdc7-3640-4e3a-aa91-d0e03f990c38

Davies, Donna E. (2014) Epithelial barrier function and immunity in asthma. Annals of the American Thoracic Society, 11, supplement 5, S244-S451. (doi:10.1513/AnnalsATS.201407-304AW). (PMID:25525727)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The bronchial epithelium is constantly exposed to a wide range of environmental materials present in inhaled air, including noxious gases and anthropogenic and natural particulates, such as gas and particles from car emissions, tobacco smoke, pollens, animal dander, and pathogens. As a fully differentiated, pseudostratified mucociliary epithelium, the bronchial epithelium protects the internal milieu of the lung from these agents by forming a physical barrier involving adhesive complexes and a chemical barrier involving secretion of mucus, which traps inhaled particles that can be cleared by the mucociliary escalator. It is a testament to the effectiveness of these two barriers that most environmental challenges are largely overcome without the need to develop an inflammatory response. However, as the initial cell of contact with the environment, the bronchial epithelium also plays a pivotal role in immune surveillance and appropriate activation of immune effector cells and antigen presenting cells in the presence of pathogens or other danger signals. Thus, the bronchial epithelium plays a central role in controlling tissue homeostasis and innate immunity. This review will discuss these barrier properties and how dysregulation of these homeostatic mechanisms can contribute to disease pathologies such as asthma.

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Published date: December 2014
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 380861
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/380861
ISSN: 2329-6933
PURE UUID: a93b3f26-e9e7-497f-a6e0-b9a2bd33ed85
ORCID for Donna E. Davies: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5117-2991

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Sep 2015 09:21
Last modified: 05 Nov 2019 02:09

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