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Who cares? Continuity and change in the prevalence of caring, and characteristics of informal carers, in England and Wales 2001-2011

Who cares? Continuity and change in the prevalence of caring, and characteristics of informal carers, in England and Wales 2001-2011
Who cares? Continuity and change in the prevalence of caring, and characteristics of informal carers, in England and Wales 2001-2011
Over the past two decades there has been a growing recognition of the key contribution made to social care by unpaid care provided by family, neighbours and friends. Increases in the proportion of the population aged 75 and over in England and Wales, combined with continuing local authority budget cuts, means that the provision of unpaid care is, and is likely to remain, a key social policy issue. Reflecting the importance of informal caring, the 2001 and 2011 UK Censuses included a question on provision of informal care and the intensity of any care provided. In 2001 5.9 million people were providing informal care; by 2011 this had increased to 6.5 million. This paper presents the first comparative analysis of the prevalence of informal caring in 2001 and 2011 using the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Longitudinal Study (LS) to identify the determinants of providing informal care at 2001 and at 2011. This analysis benchmarks the ONS LS results against national level census results before examining the prevalence of informal caring, and the intensity of care provided, by a range of demographic and socio-economic characteristics including gender, age, marital status, ethnicity, housing tenure, economic activity and health. The research investigates the influence of different characteristics at 2001 and 2011 using binary logistic regression models. In so doing we profile a range of characteristics associated with informal caring, and compare 2001 and 2011 side by side for the first time.
informal caring, living arrangements, health, older people, census, office for national statistics longitudinal study
68
ESRC Centre for Population Change
Evandrou, Maria
cd2210ea-9625-44d7-b0f4-fc0721a25d28
Falkingham, Jane
8df36615-1547-4a6d-ad55-aa9496e85519
Robards, James
4c79fa72-e722-4a2a-a289-1d2bad2c2343
Vlachantoni, Athina
06a52fbb-f2a0-4c81-9fbc-d6efc736c6cb
McGowan, Teresa
4524e894-04de-4822-8508-f4b966e12ae2
Evandrou, Maria
cd2210ea-9625-44d7-b0f4-fc0721a25d28
Falkingham, Jane
8df36615-1547-4a6d-ad55-aa9496e85519
Robards, James
4c79fa72-e722-4a2a-a289-1d2bad2c2343
Vlachantoni, Athina
06a52fbb-f2a0-4c81-9fbc-d6efc736c6cb
McGowan, Teresa
4524e894-04de-4822-8508-f4b966e12ae2

Evandrou, Maria, Falkingham, Jane, Robards, James and Vlachantoni, Athina , McGowan, Teresa (ed.) (2015) Who cares? Continuity and change in the prevalence of caring, and characteristics of informal carers, in England and Wales 2001-2011 (ESRC Centre for Population Change Working Papers, 68) Southampton. ESRC Centre for Population Change 23pp.

Record type: Monograph (Working Paper)

Abstract

Over the past two decades there has been a growing recognition of the key contribution made to social care by unpaid care provided by family, neighbours and friends. Increases in the proportion of the population aged 75 and over in England and Wales, combined with continuing local authority budget cuts, means that the provision of unpaid care is, and is likely to remain, a key social policy issue. Reflecting the importance of informal caring, the 2001 and 2011 UK Censuses included a question on provision of informal care and the intensity of any care provided. In 2001 5.9 million people were providing informal care; by 2011 this had increased to 6.5 million. This paper presents the first comparative analysis of the prevalence of informal caring in 2001 and 2011 using the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Longitudinal Study (LS) to identify the determinants of providing informal care at 2001 and at 2011. This analysis benchmarks the ONS LS results against national level census results before examining the prevalence of informal caring, and the intensity of care provided, by a range of demographic and socio-economic characteristics including gender, age, marital status, ethnicity, housing tenure, economic activity and health. The research investigates the influence of different characteristics at 2001 and 2011 using binary logistic regression models. In so doing we profile a range of characteristics associated with informal caring, and compare 2001 and 2011 side by side for the first time.

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More information

Published date: 28 August 2015
Keywords: informal caring, living arrangements, health, older people, census, office for national statistics longitudinal study
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography, Gerontology, Centre for Population Change, Faculty of Social, Human and Mathematical Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 381035
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/381035
PURE UUID: cbe0e8f7-4fe4-46cc-91ad-40d28c4b755d
ORCID for Maria Evandrou: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2115-9358
ORCID for Jane Falkingham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7135-5875
ORCID for James Robards: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4784-5679
ORCID for Athina Vlachantoni: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1539-3057

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Sep 2015 11:02
Last modified: 27 Jan 2020 13:41

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