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Maternal folate status, but not that of vitamins B-12 or B-6, is associated with gestational age and preterm birth risk in a multi-ethnic Asian population

Maternal folate status, but not that of vitamins B-12 or B-6, is associated with gestational age and preterm birth risk in a multi-ethnic Asian population
Maternal folate status, but not that of vitamins B-12 or B-6, is associated with gestational age and preterm birth risk in a multi-ethnic Asian population
Background: maternal folate, vitamin B-12, and vitamin B-6 concentrations during pregnancy have been shown to influence birth outcomes, but the evidence is inconclusive.

Objective: we aimed to examine the associations of maternal B-vitamin status with gestational age, birth weight, and length in a birth cohort study in Singapore.

Methods: maternal blood samples (n = 999) collected during weeks 26–28 of gestation were assayed for plasma folate, vitamin B-12, and vitamin B-6 concentrations. Birth weight and gestational age data were obtained from hospital records, and other anthropometric variables were measured within 72 h after birth. Relations between B-vitamin status and birth outcomes were assessed by linear or logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders.

Results: median (IQR) plasma concentrations were 34.4 (24.5–44.6) nmol/L for folate, 209 (167–258) pmol/L for vitamin B-12, and 61.8 (25.9–113) nmol/L for vitamin B-6. We found that higher plasma folate concentrations were associated with a longer gestational age (0.12 wk per SD increase in folate; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.21) and tended to be associated with lower risk of all preterm birth (delivery at <37 wk of gestation; OR: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.63, 1.00) and spontaneous preterm birth (OR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.56, 1.04). Overall, concentrations of maternal folate, vitamin B-12, and vitamin B-6 were not independently associated with birth weight or being born small for gestational age (SGA; birth weight <10th percentile for gestational age).

Conclusions: higher maternal folate concentrations during late pregnancy were associated with longer gestational age and tended to be associated with a lower risk of preterm birth in this multiethnic Asian population. In contrast, the results of our study suggested little or no benefit of higher folate concentrations for reducing the risk of SGA or of higher vitamin B-6 and vitamin B-12 concentrations for reducing the risk of preterm birth or SGA
pregnancy, folate, vitamin B-12, vitamin B-6, gestational age, preterm birth, birth weight, small for gestational age, birth length, birth outcomes
0022-3166
113-120
Chen, L.W.
59362eef-bb95-4927-ab2d-f8a4495d90a4
Lim, A.L.
95297b10-ba76-431a-bfd2-cbe1a3e4012e
Colega, M.
222d8007-2da2-4240-b08a-636dd99879e1
Tint, M.T.
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Aris, I.M.
ee15a46e-ead3-4b4a-a208-d39038a85480
Tan, C.S.
d395e487-a4c8-4ee0-b7f1-f326798dfb26
Chong, Y.S.
b50c99c9-4d83-46c5-a1c7-23f9a553ab8a
Gluckman, P.D.
492295c0-ef71-4871-ad5a-771c98e1059a
Godfrey, K.M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Kwek, K.
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Saw, S.M.
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Yap, F.
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Lee, Y.S.
829a41bb-945c-49cd-ad12-0f3d9c2782c6
Chong, M.F.
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van Dam, R.M.
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Chen, L.W.
59362eef-bb95-4927-ab2d-f8a4495d90a4
Lim, A.L.
95297b10-ba76-431a-bfd2-cbe1a3e4012e
Colega, M.
222d8007-2da2-4240-b08a-636dd99879e1
Tint, M.T.
02d6a006-3b94-4328-b3c3-147a618d66c3
Aris, I.M.
ee15a46e-ead3-4b4a-a208-d39038a85480
Tan, C.S.
d395e487-a4c8-4ee0-b7f1-f326798dfb26
Chong, Y.S.
b50c99c9-4d83-46c5-a1c7-23f9a553ab8a
Gluckman, P.D.
492295c0-ef71-4871-ad5a-771c98e1059a
Godfrey, K.M.
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Kwek, K.
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Saw, S.M.
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Yap, F.
2c155211-be02-4dd5-9528-16a714e77452
Lee, Y.S.
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Chong, M.F.
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van Dam, R.M.
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Chen, L.W., Lim, A.L., Colega, M., Tint, M.T., Aris, I.M., Tan, C.S., Chong, Y.S., Gluckman, P.D., Godfrey, K.M., Kwek, K., Saw, S.M., Yap, F., Lee, Y.S., Chong, M.F. and van Dam, R.M. (2015) Maternal folate status, but not that of vitamins B-12 or B-6, is associated with gestational age and preterm birth risk in a multi-ethnic Asian population. Journal of Nutrition, 145 (1), 113-120. (doi:10.3945/jn.114.196352). (PMID:25527665)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: maternal folate, vitamin B-12, and vitamin B-6 concentrations during pregnancy have been shown to influence birth outcomes, but the evidence is inconclusive.

Objective: we aimed to examine the associations of maternal B-vitamin status with gestational age, birth weight, and length in a birth cohort study in Singapore.

Methods: maternal blood samples (n = 999) collected during weeks 26–28 of gestation were assayed for plasma folate, vitamin B-12, and vitamin B-6 concentrations. Birth weight and gestational age data were obtained from hospital records, and other anthropometric variables were measured within 72 h after birth. Relations between B-vitamin status and birth outcomes were assessed by linear or logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders.

Results: median (IQR) plasma concentrations were 34.4 (24.5–44.6) nmol/L for folate, 209 (167–258) pmol/L for vitamin B-12, and 61.8 (25.9–113) nmol/L for vitamin B-6. We found that higher plasma folate concentrations were associated with a longer gestational age (0.12 wk per SD increase in folate; 95% CI: 0.02, 0.21) and tended to be associated with lower risk of all preterm birth (delivery at <37 wk of gestation; OR: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.63, 1.00) and spontaneous preterm birth (OR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.56, 1.04). Overall, concentrations of maternal folate, vitamin B-12, and vitamin B-6 were not independently associated with birth weight or being born small for gestational age (SGA; birth weight <10th percentile for gestational age).

Conclusions: higher maternal folate concentrations during late pregnancy were associated with longer gestational age and tended to be associated with a lower risk of preterm birth in this multiethnic Asian population. In contrast, the results of our study suggested little or no benefit of higher folate concentrations for reducing the risk of SGA or of higher vitamin B-6 and vitamin B-12 concentrations for reducing the risk of preterm birth or SGA

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 October 2014
Published date: January 2015
Keywords: pregnancy, folate, vitamin B-12, vitamin B-6, gestational age, preterm birth, birth weight, small for gestational age, birth length, birth outcomes
Organisations: MRC Life-Course Epidemiology Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 381279
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/381279
ISSN: 0022-3166
PURE UUID: d497675c-ebcb-46e0-a9f1-c040d38307b4
ORCID for K.M. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

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Date deposited: 01 Oct 2015 10:39
Last modified: 11 Apr 2019 00:38

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Contributors

Author: L.W. Chen
Author: A.L. Lim
Author: M. Colega
Author: M.T. Tint
Author: I.M. Aris
Author: C.S. Tan
Author: Y.S. Chong
Author: P.D. Gluckman
Author: K.M. Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: K. Kwek
Author: S.M. Saw
Author: F. Yap
Author: Y.S. Lee
Author: M.F. Chong
Author: R.M. van Dam

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