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Stakeholder citizenship: the complexities of Polish migrants' citizenship attachments in the context of the Scottish independence referendum

Stakeholder citizenship: the complexities of Polish migrants' citizenship attachments in the context of the Scottish independence referendum
Stakeholder citizenship: the complexities of Polish migrants' citizenship attachments in the context of the Scottish independence referendum
This article focuses on the experiences of Scotland's largest foreign-born minority group, namely Poles, in the run-up to the Scottish independence referendum in 2014. We draw on 20 in-depth interviews to explore our participants’ intentions and justifications for voting (or not) in the referendum. We found that our participants tended to emphasise the jus domicili principle when justifying their eligibility to vote in the referendum. However, our participants extended the jus domicili principle in their justifications to also include the intention to stay in Scotland as a central aspect of their continuing stake in (and right to vote in the referendum to determine) Scotland's future. Through exploring our participants’ justifications for voting in the referendum, we were able to examine and better understand how migrants constitute their citizenship through articulating their substantive attachments (social, economic and relational or familial) in their adoptive country and in their country of origin.
citizenship, polish migrants, voting rights, Scottish independence referendum, migration
1362-1025
115-129
McGhee, Derek
63b8ae1e-8a71-470c-b780-2f0a95631902
Pietka-Nykaza, Emilia
9a3219f0-54de-4574-859a-ec46cb74874a
McGhee, Derek
63b8ae1e-8a71-470c-b780-2f0a95631902
Pietka-Nykaza, Emilia
9a3219f0-54de-4574-859a-ec46cb74874a

McGhee, Derek and Pietka-Nykaza, Emilia (2016) Stakeholder citizenship: the complexities of Polish migrants' citizenship attachments in the context of the Scottish independence referendum. Citizenship Studies, 20 (1), 115-129. (doi:10.1080/13621025.2015.1054789).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article focuses on the experiences of Scotland's largest foreign-born minority group, namely Poles, in the run-up to the Scottish independence referendum in 2014. We draw on 20 in-depth interviews to explore our participants’ intentions and justifications for voting (or not) in the referendum. We found that our participants tended to emphasise the jus domicili principle when justifying their eligibility to vote in the referendum. However, our participants extended the jus domicili principle in their justifications to also include the intention to stay in Scotland as a central aspect of their continuing stake in (and right to vote in the referendum to determine) Scotland's future. Through exploring our participants’ justifications for voting in the referendum, we were able to examine and better understand how migrants constitute their citizenship through articulating their substantive attachments (social, economic and relational or familial) in their adoptive country and in their country of origin.

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Migrants citizen attachments in the context of Scottish independent referendum - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 May 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 August 2015
Published date: 2016
Keywords: citizenship, polish migrants, voting rights, Scottish independence referendum, migration
Organisations: Sociology, Social Policy & Criminology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 381334
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/381334
ISSN: 1362-1025
PURE UUID: 03c729f4-4236-43a7-a0b5-21341939b7d8
ORCID for Derek McGhee: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3226-6300

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Oct 2015 09:24
Last modified: 16 Dec 2019 20:14

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