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Association between cerebral palsy and microscopically verified placental infarction in extremely preterm infants

Association between cerebral palsy and microscopically verified placental infarction in extremely preterm infants
Association between cerebral palsy and microscopically verified placental infarction in extremely preterm infants
Introduction: previously, cerebral palsy has been associated with placental infarctions diagnosed macroscopically by midwifes. However, the risk of misclassification of infarctionsis is high without a histological verification. Therefore, the objective of this study was to study placental histopathology in relation to developmental outcome at 2.5 years corrected age in a population born extremely preterm.

Material and methods: a prospective cohort study was carried out at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden on a population of 139 live born infants delivered <27 gestational weeks during 2004–2007. A senior perinatal pathologist, who was blinded to outcome data, evaluated all placental slides microscopically. Neuromotor and sensory functions of the children were evaluated. Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-III (Bayley-III) were used to assess development at corrected age 2.5 years. The outcome data were evaluated without reference to obstetrical and pathology data. The primary outcome measure was neurological and developmental status at 2.5 years of corrected age. This was measured as diagnosis of cerebral palsy, visual impairment, hearing impairment as well as performance on Bayley-III scales evaluating cognitive, language and motor functions.

Results: two out of seven children with placental infarction were diagnosed with cerebral palsy compared with one child of 51 without placental infarction (p = 0.036). For developmental outcome according to Bayley-III at 2.5 years no statistically significant associations with placental pathology were found.

Conclusion: possible association between placental infarction, verified by microscopic examination, and cerebral palsy has been identified in this extremely preterm population
cerebral palsy, fetal medicine, neurodisability, neurodevelopmental disability, neurodevelopmental outcome, neurodevelopment, placenta and preterm delivery
976-982
Vinnars, Marie-Therese
1b770c71-da94-4431-b5b2-b32f615bad04
Nasiell, Josefine
14531171-fa75-4854-8a51-c4cc53f9b8ce
Papadogiannakis, Nikos
ff5ef3b7-841b-4eca-a0a0-b60160c9b83b
Westgren, Magnus
ad9460b1-bf01-4c0e-8e7b-f7d17bb2dd39
Vinnars, Marie-Therese
1b770c71-da94-4431-b5b2-b32f615bad04
Nasiell, Josefine
14531171-fa75-4854-8a51-c4cc53f9b8ce
Papadogiannakis, Nikos
ff5ef3b7-841b-4eca-a0a0-b60160c9b83b
Westgren, Magnus
ad9460b1-bf01-4c0e-8e7b-f7d17bb2dd39

Vinnars, Marie-Therese, Nasiell, Josefine, Papadogiannakis, Nikos and Westgren, Magnus (2015) Association between cerebral palsy and microscopically verified placental infarction in extremely preterm infants. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 94 (9), 976-982. (doi:10.1111/aogs.12688). (PMID:26054014)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction: previously, cerebral palsy has been associated with placental infarctions diagnosed macroscopically by midwifes. However, the risk of misclassification of infarctionsis is high without a histological verification. Therefore, the objective of this study was to study placental histopathology in relation to developmental outcome at 2.5 years corrected age in a population born extremely preterm.

Material and methods: a prospective cohort study was carried out at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden on a population of 139 live born infants delivered <27 gestational weeks during 2004–2007. A senior perinatal pathologist, who was blinded to outcome data, evaluated all placental slides microscopically. Neuromotor and sensory functions of the children were evaluated. Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-III (Bayley-III) were used to assess development at corrected age 2.5 years. The outcome data were evaluated without reference to obstetrical and pathology data. The primary outcome measure was neurological and developmental status at 2.5 years of corrected age. This was measured as diagnosis of cerebral palsy, visual impairment, hearing impairment as well as performance on Bayley-III scales evaluating cognitive, language and motor functions.

Results: two out of seven children with placental infarction were diagnosed with cerebral palsy compared with one child of 51 without placental infarction (p = 0.036). For developmental outcome according to Bayley-III at 2.5 years no statistically significant associations with placental pathology were found.

Conclusion: possible association between placental infarction, verified by microscopic examination, and cerebral palsy has been identified in this extremely preterm population

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 June 2015
Published date: September 2015
Keywords: cerebral palsy, fetal medicine, neurodisability, neurodevelopmental disability, neurodevelopmental outcome, neurodevelopment, placenta and preterm delivery
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 381658
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/381658
PURE UUID: f1748624-b0f1-4fc5-bbfe-d4fee22279c8

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Date deposited: 09 Oct 2015 13:25
Last modified: 09 Aug 2017 16:31

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