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Modeling microdamage behavior of cortical bone

Modeling microdamage behavior of cortical bone
Modeling microdamage behavior of cortical bone
Bone is a complex material which exhibits several hierarchical levels of structural organization. At the submicron-scale, the local tissue porosity gives rise to discontinuities in the bone matrix which have been shown to influence damage behavior. Computational tools to model the damage behavior of bone at different length scales are mostly based on finite element (FE) analysis, with a range of algorithms developed for this purpose. Although the local mechanical behavior of bone tissue is influenced by microstructural features such as bone canals and osteocyte lacunae, they are often not considered in FE damage models due to the high computational cost required to simulate across several length scales, i.e., from the loads applied at the organ level down to the stresses and strains around bone canals and osteocyte lacunae. Hence, the aim of the current study was twofold: First, a multilevel FE framework was developed to compute, starting from the loads applied at the whole bone scale, the local mechanical forces acting at the micrometer and submicrometer level. Second, three simple microdamage simulation procedures based on element removal were developed and applied to bone samples at the submicrometer-scale, where cortical microporosity is included. The present microdamage algorithm produced a qualitatively analogous behavior to previous experimental tests based on stepwise mechanical compression combined with in situ synchrotron radiation computed tomography. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of simulating microdamage at a physiologically relevant scale using an image-based meshing technique and multilevel FE analysis; this allows relating microdamage behavior to intracortical bone microstructure.
multilevel finite element analysis, bone microstructure, cortical porosity, microdamage, bone quality
1617-7959
1227-1242
Donaldson, Finn
09f7fc00-f29e-4359-9ecb-598a64ad8013
Ruffoni, Davide
5513c935-0c91-433a-b801-b370100b5ffa
Schneider, Philipp
a810f925-4808-44e4-8a4a-a51586f9d7ad
Levchuk, Alina
252a6376-fd80-49d7-a6ac-f2368c00d62b
Zwahlen, Alexander
793e26e0-fd9b-49eb-900a-e4a890897d69
Pankaj, Pankaj
2a2f5eff-82ec-4ec2-b122-df7c3bf4794d
Müller, Ralph
f881853a-540f-48f1-bb6d-e0cf1894e036
Donaldson, Finn
09f7fc00-f29e-4359-9ecb-598a64ad8013
Ruffoni, Davide
5513c935-0c91-433a-b801-b370100b5ffa
Schneider, Philipp
a810f925-4808-44e4-8a4a-a51586f9d7ad
Levchuk, Alina
252a6376-fd80-49d7-a6ac-f2368c00d62b
Zwahlen, Alexander
793e26e0-fd9b-49eb-900a-e4a890897d69
Pankaj, Pankaj
2a2f5eff-82ec-4ec2-b122-df7c3bf4794d
Müller, Ralph
f881853a-540f-48f1-bb6d-e0cf1894e036

Donaldson, Finn, Ruffoni, Davide, Schneider, Philipp, Levchuk, Alina, Zwahlen, Alexander, Pankaj, Pankaj and Müller, Ralph (2014) Modeling microdamage behavior of cortical bone. Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology, 13 (6), 1227-1242. (doi:10.1007/s10237-014-0568-6). (PMID:24622917)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Bone is a complex material which exhibits several hierarchical levels of structural organization. At the submicron-scale, the local tissue porosity gives rise to discontinuities in the bone matrix which have been shown to influence damage behavior. Computational tools to model the damage behavior of bone at different length scales are mostly based on finite element (FE) analysis, with a range of algorithms developed for this purpose. Although the local mechanical behavior of bone tissue is influenced by microstructural features such as bone canals and osteocyte lacunae, they are often not considered in FE damage models due to the high computational cost required to simulate across several length scales, i.e., from the loads applied at the organ level down to the stresses and strains around bone canals and osteocyte lacunae. Hence, the aim of the current study was twofold: First, a multilevel FE framework was developed to compute, starting from the loads applied at the whole bone scale, the local mechanical forces acting at the micrometer and submicrometer level. Second, three simple microdamage simulation procedures based on element removal were developed and applied to bone samples at the submicrometer-scale, where cortical microporosity is included. The present microdamage algorithm produced a qualitatively analogous behavior to previous experimental tests based on stepwise mechanical compression combined with in situ synchrotron radiation computed tomography. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of simulating microdamage at a physiologically relevant scale using an image-based meshing technique and multilevel FE analysis; this allows relating microdamage behavior to intracortical bone microstructure.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 25 February 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 March 2014
Published date: November 2014
Keywords: multilevel finite element analysis, bone microstructure, cortical porosity, microdamage, bone quality
Organisations: Bioengineering Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 381911
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/381911
ISSN: 1617-7959
PURE UUID: 04004cc7-89f7-479c-a91d-660781334a27
ORCID for Philipp Schneider: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7499-3576

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Oct 2015 09:03
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:04

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