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Quantitative phenotyping of bone fracture repair: a review

Quantitative phenotyping of bone fracture repair: a review
Quantitative phenotyping of bone fracture repair: a review
Fracture repair is a complex process that involves the interaction of numerous molecular factors, cell lineages and tissue types. These biological processes allow for an impressive feat of engineering: an elastic soft callus is progressively replaced by a more rigid and mineralized callus. During this reparative phase, the healing bone is exposed to a risk of re-fracture. Bone volume and bone quality are the two major factors determining the strength of the callus. Although both factors are important, often only bone volume is analyzed and reported in preclinical studies. Recent developments in techniques for examining bone quality in the callus will enable the rapid and detailed analysis of its material properties and its microstructure. This review aims to give an overview of the methods available for quantitatively phenotyping the bone callus in preclinical studies such as Raman spectroscopy, nanoindentation, scanning acoustic microscopy, in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and high-resolution micro-CT. Consolidated and emerging experimental methods are described with a focus on their applicability, and with examples of their utilization.
1-8
Casanova, Michele
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Schindeler, Aaron
8d1eff15-dc0d-4fd7-ba28-06c2d41cd5cb
Little, David
cb88e4ce-b97b-45ee-a016-dc1c9fc00373
Müller, Ralph
f881853a-540f-48f1-bb6d-e0cf1894e036
Schneider, Philipp
a810f925-4808-44e4-8a4a-a51586f9d7ad
Casanova, Michele
6fece42d-9268-4e0f-9c14-1b1b4d74961e
Schindeler, Aaron
8d1eff15-dc0d-4fd7-ba28-06c2d41cd5cb
Little, David
cb88e4ce-b97b-45ee-a016-dc1c9fc00373
Müller, Ralph
f881853a-540f-48f1-bb6d-e0cf1894e036
Schneider, Philipp
a810f925-4808-44e4-8a4a-a51586f9d7ad

Casanova, Michele, Schindeler, Aaron, Little, David, Müller, Ralph and Schneider, Philipp (2014) Quantitative phenotyping of bone fracture repair: a review. BoneKEy Reports, 3 (550), 1-8. (doi:10.1038/bonekey.2014.45). (PMID:25120907)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Fracture repair is a complex process that involves the interaction of numerous molecular factors, cell lineages and tissue types. These biological processes allow for an impressive feat of engineering: an elastic soft callus is progressively replaced by a more rigid and mineralized callus. During this reparative phase, the healing bone is exposed to a risk of re-fracture. Bone volume and bone quality are the two major factors determining the strength of the callus. Although both factors are important, often only bone volume is analyzed and reported in preclinical studies. Recent developments in techniques for examining bone quality in the callus will enable the rapid and detailed analysis of its material properties and its microstructure. This review aims to give an overview of the methods available for quantitatively phenotyping the bone callus in preclinical studies such as Raman spectroscopy, nanoindentation, scanning acoustic microscopy, in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and high-resolution micro-CT. Consolidated and emerging experimental methods are described with a focus on their applicability, and with examples of their utilization.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 May 2014
Published date: 30 July 2014
Organisations: Bioengineering Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 381912
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/381912
PURE UUID: ed1ce211-a848-4080-b2da-7fada117f07b
ORCID for Philipp Schneider: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7499-3576

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Oct 2015 08:57
Last modified: 14 Jul 2020 00:35

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