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Keep the driver in control: automating automobiles of the future

Keep the driver in control: automating automobiles of the future
Keep the driver in control: automating automobiles of the future
Automated automobiles will be on our roads within the next decade but the role of the driver has not yet been formerly recognised or designed. Rather, the driver is often left in a passive monitoring role until they are required to reclaim control from the vehicle. This research aimed to test the idea of driver-initiated automation, in which the automation offers decision support that can be either accepted or ignored. The test case examined a combination of lateral and longitudinal control in addition to an auto-overtake system. Despite putting the driver in control of the automated systems by enabling them to accept or ignore behavioural suggestions (e.g. overtake), there were still issues associated with increased workload and decreased trust. These issues are likely to have arisen due to the way in which the automated system has been designed. Recommendations for improvements in systems design have been made which are likely to improve trust and make the role of the driver more transparent concerning their authority over the automated system.
automation, driver trust, driver workload, thematic analysis
0003-6870
389-395
Banks, Victoria
0dbdcad0-c654-4b87-a804-6a7548d0196d
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Banks, Victoria
0dbdcad0-c654-4b87-a804-6a7548d0196d
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd

Banks, Victoria and Stanton, Neville (2016) Keep the driver in control: automating automobiles of the future. [in special issue: Transport in the 21st Century: The Application of Human Factors to Future User Needs] Applied Ergonomics, 53, part B, 389-395. (doi:10.1016/j.apergo.2015.06.020).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Automated automobiles will be on our roads within the next decade but the role of the driver has not yet been formerly recognised or designed. Rather, the driver is often left in a passive monitoring role until they are required to reclaim control from the vehicle. This research aimed to test the idea of driver-initiated automation, in which the automation offers decision support that can be either accepted or ignored. The test case examined a combination of lateral and longitudinal control in addition to an auto-overtake system. Despite putting the driver in control of the automated systems by enabling them to accept or ignore behavioural suggestions (e.g. overtake), there were still issues associated with increased workload and decreased trust. These issues are likely to have arisen due to the way in which the automated system has been designed. Recommendations for improvements in systems design have been made which are likely to improve trust and make the role of the driver more transparent concerning their authority over the automated system.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 June 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 June 2015
Published date: March 2016
Keywords: automation, driver trust, driver workload, thematic analysis
Organisations: Transportation Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 382259
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/382259
ISSN: 0003-6870
PURE UUID: 8b19bc34-05d1-4ff3-8f16-ed25af9b9696
ORCID for Neville Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Oct 2015 14:30
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:40

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Contributors

Author: Victoria Banks
Author: Neville Stanton ORCID iD

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