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The stuttering energy transition in Germany: wind energy policy and feed-in tariff lock-in

The stuttering energy transition in Germany: wind energy policy and feed-in tariff lock-in
The stuttering energy transition in Germany: wind energy policy and feed-in tariff lock-in
This article aims to examine whether the formulation of specific low carbon policy such as the feed-in tariff for wind energy in Germany can partly be a barrier to a comprehensive energy transition (Energiewende). Despite their short and medium-term success, these policies could create a long-term lock-in if they are formulated in a way that leads to a stagnation of systems innovation. The research finds that while the share of wind energy has increased rapidly over time, the feed-in-tariff and other low carbon policies and incentives have not been sufficient to achieve a socio-technical regime transition in Germany yet. We suggest that the German feed-in-tariff has incorporated wind energy (a niche-innovation) and wind energy actors (pathway newcomers) into a slightly modified socio-technical regime that is rather similar to the earlier ‘fossil fuel dominant’ socio-technical regime.
wind energy, germany, energy policy, national innovation systems
0301-4215
156-165
Nordensvärd, Johan
44e3b534-aa45-4124-9680-35e8fb6f2e98
Urban, Frauke
26206e27-cfa8-4efb-97cb-d06f22d8ed5f
Nordensvärd, Johan
44e3b534-aa45-4124-9680-35e8fb6f2e98
Urban, Frauke
26206e27-cfa8-4efb-97cb-d06f22d8ed5f

Nordensvärd, Johan and Urban, Frauke (2015) The stuttering energy transition in Germany: wind energy policy and feed-in tariff lock-in. Energy Policy, 82, 156-165. (doi:10.1016/j.enpol.2015.03.009).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article aims to examine whether the formulation of specific low carbon policy such as the feed-in tariff for wind energy in Germany can partly be a barrier to a comprehensive energy transition (Energiewende). Despite their short and medium-term success, these policies could create a long-term lock-in if they are formulated in a way that leads to a stagnation of systems innovation. The research finds that while the share of wind energy has increased rapidly over time, the feed-in-tariff and other low carbon policies and incentives have not been sufficient to achieve a socio-technical regime transition in Germany yet. We suggest that the German feed-in-tariff has incorporated wind energy (a niche-innovation) and wind energy actors (pathway newcomers) into a slightly modified socio-technical regime that is rather similar to the earlier ‘fossil fuel dominant’ socio-technical regime.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 March 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 March 2015
Published date: July 2015
Keywords: wind energy, germany, energy policy, national innovation systems
Organisations: Social Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 382493
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/382493
ISSN: 0301-4215
PURE UUID: e0ec555d-21c2-449c-9c37-3c80b796459e

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Oct 2015 11:30
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 03:24

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Contributors

Author: Johan Nordensvärd
Author: Frauke Urban

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