The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Broad-scale patterns of sex ratios in Patella spp.: a comparison of range edge and central range populations in the British Isles and Portugal

Broad-scale patterns of sex ratios in Patella spp.: a comparison of range edge and central range populations in the British Isles and Portugal
Broad-scale patterns of sex ratios in Patella spp.: a comparison of range edge and central range populations in the British Isles and Portugal
Sex change, or sequential hermaphroditism, occurs in the plant and animal kingdoms and often determines a predominance of the first sex. Our aim was to explore changes in sex ratios within the range of the species studied: Patella vulgata and Patella depressa. The broad-scale survey of sex with size of limpets covered a range of latitudes from Zambujeira do Mar (southern Portugal) to the English Channel. Indirect evidence was found for the occurrence of protandry in P. vulgata populations from the south of England, with females predominating in larger size-classes; cumulative frequency distributions of males and females were different; sex ratios were biased towards males and smallest sizes of males were smaller than the smallest sizes of females. In contrast in Portugal females were found in most size-classes of P. vulgata. In P. depressa populations from the south coast of England and Portugal females were interspersed across most size-classes; size distributions of males and females and size at first maturity of males and females did not differ. P. depressa did, however, show some indications of the possibility of slight protandry occurring in Portugal. The test of sex ratio variation with latitude indicated that P. vulgata sex ratios might be involved in determining the species range limit, particularly at the equatorward limit since the likelihood of being male decreased from the south coast of England to southern Portugal. Thus at the southern range limit, sperm could be in short supply due to scarcity of males contributing to an Allee effect.
limpets, protandry, range distribution, sex change, sex ratio
0025-3154
1141-1153
Borges, C.D.G.
5c6c1eb0-e261-40cb-a647-adc2b70008d0
Doncaster, C.P.
0eff2f42-fa0a-4e35-b6ac-475ad3482047
Maclean, M.A.
61661eb4-5549-4b68-b085-6fdd352664cb
Hawkins, S.J.
758fe1c1-30cd-4ed1-bb65-2471dc7c11fa
Borges, C.D.G.
5c6c1eb0-e261-40cb-a647-adc2b70008d0
Doncaster, C.P.
0eff2f42-fa0a-4e35-b6ac-475ad3482047
Maclean, M.A.
61661eb4-5549-4b68-b085-6fdd352664cb
Hawkins, S.J.
758fe1c1-30cd-4ed1-bb65-2471dc7c11fa

Borges, C.D.G., Doncaster, C.P., Maclean, M.A. and Hawkins, S.J. (2015) Broad-scale patterns of sex ratios in Patella spp.: a comparison of range edge and central range populations in the British Isles and Portugal. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 95 (6), 1141-1153. (doi:10.1017/S0025315415000417).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Sex change, or sequential hermaphroditism, occurs in the plant and animal kingdoms and often determines a predominance of the first sex. Our aim was to explore changes in sex ratios within the range of the species studied: Patella vulgata and Patella depressa. The broad-scale survey of sex with size of limpets covered a range of latitudes from Zambujeira do Mar (southern Portugal) to the English Channel. Indirect evidence was found for the occurrence of protandry in P. vulgata populations from the south of England, with females predominating in larger size-classes; cumulative frequency distributions of males and females were different; sex ratios were biased towards males and smallest sizes of males were smaller than the smallest sizes of females. In contrast in Portugal females were found in most size-classes of P. vulgata. In P. depressa populations from the south coast of England and Portugal females were interspersed across most size-classes; size distributions of males and females and size at first maturity of males and females did not differ. P. depressa did, however, show some indications of the possibility of slight protandry occurring in Portugal. The test of sex ratio variation with latitude indicated that P. vulgata sex ratios might be involved in determining the species range limit, particularly at the equatorward limit since the likelihood of being male decreased from the south coast of England to southern Portugal. Thus at the southern range limit, sperm could be in short supply due to scarcity of males contributing to an Allee effect.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 10 April 2015
Published date: September 2015
Keywords: limpets, protandry, range distribution, sex change, sex ratio
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 382539
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/382539
ISSN: 0025-3154
PURE UUID: 2e0a99b0-1ae3-46de-ad70-fe448a254ef8
ORCID for C.P. Doncaster: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9406-0693
ORCID for M.A. Maclean: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0821-5781

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Oct 2015 15:43
Last modified: 24 Sep 2019 00:56

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: C.D.G. Borges
Author: C.P. Doncaster ORCID iD
Author: M.A. Maclean ORCID iD
Author: S.J. Hawkins

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×