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Storytelling domestic violence: feminist politics of participatory video in Cambodia

Storytelling domestic violence: feminist politics of participatory video in Cambodia
Storytelling domestic violence: feminist politics of participatory video in Cambodia
Domestic violence is often referred to in development circles as the most pervasive, yet least recognised, human rights abuse in the world. Based on four participatory video (PV) workshops in Cambodia, the paper analyses spontaneous and orchestrated forms of storytelling on this normatively “private” issue. Bringing into conversation emerging geographical scholarship on storytelling with more established PV literature, it provides an exploration of the feminist politics that arise when participants’ narratives belie established academic knowledge on the causes of, and solutions to, domestic violence. In tandem with questioning whose narrative authority “counts”, the paper works to problematise commonly held assumptions about the efficacy of PV to overcome hegemonic norms and discourses
1492-9732
Brickell, Katherine
b47f9cf0-1952-4a29-8004-e457e84a4ee1
Garrett, Bradley
e51aa011-881c-4284-8889-124b1b52efc7
Brickell, Katherine
b47f9cf0-1952-4a29-8004-e457e84a4ee1
Garrett, Bradley
e51aa011-881c-4284-8889-124b1b52efc7

Brickell, Katherine and Garrett, Bradley (2015) Storytelling domestic violence: feminist politics of participatory video in Cambodia. ACME: an International E-journal for Critical Geographies, 14 (3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Domestic violence is often referred to in development circles as the most pervasive, yet least recognised, human rights abuse in the world. Based on four participatory video (PV) workshops in Cambodia, the paper analyses spontaneous and orchestrated forms of storytelling on this normatively “private” issue. Bringing into conversation emerging geographical scholarship on storytelling with more established PV literature, it provides an exploration of the feminist politics that arise when participants’ narratives belie established academic knowledge on the causes of, and solutions to, domestic violence. In tandem with questioning whose narrative authority “counts”, the paper works to problematise commonly held assumptions about the efficacy of PV to overcome hegemonic norms and discourses

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More information

Published date: 10 October 2015
Organisations: Geography & Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 382789
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/382789
ISSN: 1492-9732
PURE UUID: 1b5991e6-2232-41f6-b08a-07d34fc21a3b
ORCID for Bradley Garrett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0414-3175

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 02 Nov 2015 14:28
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:22

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Contributors

Author: Katherine Brickell
Author: Bradley Garrett ORCID iD

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