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Trends in microfluidic systems for in situ chemical analysis of natural waters

Trends in microfluidic systems for in situ chemical analysis of natural waters
Trends in microfluidic systems for in situ chemical analysis of natural waters
Spatially and temporally detailed measurement of ocean, river and lake chemistry is key to fully understanding the biogeochemical processes at work within them. To obtain these valuable data, miniaturised in situ chemical analysers have recently become an attractive alternative to traditional manual sampling, with microfluidic technology at the forefront of recent advances. In this short critical review we discuss the role, operation and application of in situ microfluidic analysers to measure biogeochemical parameters in natural waters. We describe recent technical developments, most notably how pumping technology has evolved to allow long-term deployments, and describe how they have been deployed in real-world situations to yield detailed, scientifically useful data. Finally, we discuss the technical challenges that still remain and the key obstacles that must be negotiated if these promising systems are to be widely adopted and used, for example, in large environmental sensor networks and on low-power underwater vehicles.
microfluidics, lab-on-chip, chemical sensors, optical sensors, in situ, in-the-field, environmental chemistry, analytical chemistry, oceanography
0925-4005
1398-1405
Nightingale, Adrian
4b51311d-c6c3-40d5-a13f-ab8917031ab3
Beaton, Alexander D.
b33c89f0-5c08-4cbb-9718-51c5c5179ff0
Mowlem, Matthew C.
6f633ca2-298f-48ee-a025-ce52dd62124f
Nightingale, Adrian
4b51311d-c6c3-40d5-a13f-ab8917031ab3
Beaton, Alexander D.
b33c89f0-5c08-4cbb-9718-51c5c5179ff0
Mowlem, Matthew C.
6f633ca2-298f-48ee-a025-ce52dd62124f

Nightingale, Adrian, Beaton, Alexander D. and Mowlem, Matthew C. (2015) Trends in microfluidic systems for in situ chemical analysis of natural waters. Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, 221, 1398-1405. (doi:10.1016/j.snb.2015.07.091).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Spatially and temporally detailed measurement of ocean, river and lake chemistry is key to fully understanding the biogeochemical processes at work within them. To obtain these valuable data, miniaturised in situ chemical analysers have recently become an attractive alternative to traditional manual sampling, with microfluidic technology at the forefront of recent advances. In this short critical review we discuss the role, operation and application of in situ microfluidic analysers to measure biogeochemical parameters in natural waters. We describe recent technical developments, most notably how pumping technology has evolved to allow long-term deployments, and describe how they have been deployed in real-world situations to yield detailed, scientifically useful data. Finally, we discuss the technical challenges that still remain and the key obstacles that must be negotiated if these promising systems are to be widely adopted and used, for example, in large environmental sensor networks and on low-power underwater vehicles.

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Accepted/In Press date: 22 July 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 July 2015
Published date: 31 December 2015
Keywords: microfluidics, lab-on-chip, chemical sensors, optical sensors, in situ, in-the-field, environmental chemistry, analytical chemistry, oceanography
Organisations: Ocean Technology and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 382854
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/382854
ISSN: 0925-4005
PURE UUID: 49ffc4cb-fc6e-4a75-a770-6dfe8d10adbb

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Oct 2015 14:09
Last modified: 02 Dec 2019 20:31

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