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On the hydroelastic modelling of damaged ships

On the hydroelastic modelling of damaged ships
On the hydroelastic modelling of damaged ships
Recent high profile ship collision and grounding events show that such incidents occur with a higher frequency than they should; hence the survivability of ships subject to damage needs to be better understood. The long-term aim of this project is to develop a numerical, hydroelastic model that can predict the survivability of a damaged ship. This paper presents the results of the initial development of a two-dimensional hydroelastic model to numerically model the influence of abnormal loading due to floodwater ingress on the motions and global loads of a ship in regular waves using a quasi-static approach. Predictions are validated using experimental data. Results presented show promising agreement between experimental measurements and numerical predictions. The ability to carry out a systematic study of the influence of damage location, severity and ship speed on the effect of damage on a vessel is demonstrated. Future work will investigate the inclusion of both transient flooding and three-dimensional effects.
507-518
HYEL
Bennett, S.
6c2fda55-1416-4cfa-ab39-9f6eea640b95
Phillips, A.B.
f565b1da-6881-4e2a-8729-c082b869028f
Temarel, P.
b641fc50-5c8e-4540-8820-ae6779b4b0cf
Bennett, S.
6c2fda55-1416-4cfa-ab39-9f6eea640b95
Phillips, A.B.
f565b1da-6881-4e2a-8729-c082b869028f
Temarel, P.
b641fc50-5c8e-4540-8820-ae6779b4b0cf

Bennett, S., Phillips, A.B. and Temarel, P. (2015) On the hydroelastic modelling of damaged ships. In Proceedings 7th International Conference on Hydroelasticity in Marine Technology. HYEL. pp. 507-518 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Recent high profile ship collision and grounding events show that such incidents occur with a higher frequency than they should; hence the survivability of ships subject to damage needs to be better understood. The long-term aim of this project is to develop a numerical, hydroelastic model that can predict the survivability of a damaged ship. This paper presents the results of the initial development of a two-dimensional hydroelastic model to numerically model the influence of abnormal loading due to floodwater ingress on the motions and global loads of a ship in regular waves using a quasi-static approach. Predictions are validated using experimental data. Results presented show promising agreement between experimental measurements and numerical predictions. The ability to carry out a systematic study of the influence of damage location, severity and ship speed on the effect of damage on a vessel is demonstrated. Future work will investigate the inclusion of both transient flooding and three-dimensional effects.

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More information

Published date: September 2015
Venue - Dates: 7th International Conference on Hydroelasticity in Marine Technology, Croatia, 2015-09-16 - 2015-09-19
Organisations: National Oceanography Centre, Fluid Structure Interactions Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 382938
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/382938
PURE UUID: 9774866c-1eb0-4298-a9eb-92932d8c182a
ORCID for A.B. Phillips: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3234-8506
ORCID for P. Temarel: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2921-1242

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Oct 2015 10:54
Last modified: 14 Jun 2019 00:35

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