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New approaches to marine conservation through scaling up of ecological data

New approaches to marine conservation through scaling up of ecological data
New approaches to marine conservation through scaling up of ecological data
In an era of rapid global change, conservation managers urgently need improved tools to track and counter declining ecosystem conditions. This need is particularly acute in the marine realm, where threats are out of sight, inadequately mapped, cumulative, and often poorly understood, thereby generating impacts that are inefficiently managed. Recent advances in macroecology, statistical analysis, and the compilation of global data will play a central role in improving conservation outcomes, provided that global, regional, and local data streams can be integrated to produce locally relevant and interpretable outputs. Progress will be assisted by (a) expanded rollout of systematic surveys that quantify species patterns, including some carried out with help from citizen scientists; (b) coordinated experimental research networks that utilize large-scale manipulations to identify mechanisms underlying these patterns; (c) improved understanding of consequences of threats through the application of recently developed statistical techniques to analyze global species’ distributional data and associated environmental and socioeconomic factors; (d) development of reliable ecological indicators for accurate and comprehensible tracking of threats; and (e) improved data-handling and communication tools.
1941-1405
435-461
Edgar, Graham J.
7269051b-fbec-4753-be8c-1bef22e7d4ec
Bates, Amanda
a96e267d-6d22-4232-b7ed-ce4e448a2a34
Bird, Tomas J.
b491394a-2b91-42d5-8262-d1c0e9ff17cd
Jones, Alun H.
98e429d1-b604-48de-b668-6ff8844cc0dd
Kininmonth, Stuart
4409021c-0f7f-4635-9f00-feeb3a8940d2
Stuart-Smith, Rick D.
0c540bfd-5366-4a45-9cef-b3b2afa9ac44
Webb, Thomas J.
0434f28f-d42b-4782-bf59-5b8a0604781e
Edgar, Graham J.
7269051b-fbec-4753-be8c-1bef22e7d4ec
Bates, Amanda
a96e267d-6d22-4232-b7ed-ce4e448a2a34
Bird, Tomas J.
b491394a-2b91-42d5-8262-d1c0e9ff17cd
Jones, Alun H.
98e429d1-b604-48de-b668-6ff8844cc0dd
Kininmonth, Stuart
4409021c-0f7f-4635-9f00-feeb3a8940d2
Stuart-Smith, Rick D.
0c540bfd-5366-4a45-9cef-b3b2afa9ac44
Webb, Thomas J.
0434f28f-d42b-4782-bf59-5b8a0604781e

Edgar, Graham J., Bates, Amanda, Bird, Tomas J., Jones, Alun H., Kininmonth, Stuart, Stuart-Smith, Rick D. and Webb, Thomas J. (2016) New approaches to marine conservation through scaling up of ecological data. Annual Review of Marine Science, 8 (1), 435-461. (doi:10.1146/annurev-marine-122414-033921).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In an era of rapid global change, conservation managers urgently need improved tools to track and counter declining ecosystem conditions. This need is particularly acute in the marine realm, where threats are out of sight, inadequately mapped, cumulative, and often poorly understood, thereby generating impacts that are inefficiently managed. Recent advances in macroecology, statistical analysis, and the compilation of global data will play a central role in improving conservation outcomes, provided that global, regional, and local data streams can be integrated to produce locally relevant and interpretable outputs. Progress will be assisted by (a) expanded rollout of systematic surveys that quantify species patterns, including some carried out with help from citizen scientists; (b) coordinated experimental research networks that utilize large-scale manipulations to identify mechanisms underlying these patterns; (c) improved understanding of consequences of threats through the application of recently developed statistical techniques to analyze global species’ distributional data and associated environmental and socioeconomic factors; (d) development of reliable ecological indicators for accurate and comprehensible tracking of threats; and (e) improved data-handling and communication tools.

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More information

Published date: January 2016
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Geography & Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 383064
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383064
ISSN: 1941-1405
PURE UUID: 53d48d29-5fb9-4a31-b058-63524aa1ab1d

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Oct 2015 16:06
Last modified: 15 Jul 2019 21:00

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