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Platelet microvesicles (microparticles) in cardiac surgery

Platelet microvesicles (microparticles) in cardiac surgery
Platelet microvesicles (microparticles) in cardiac surgery
SIGNIFICANT POSTOPERATIVE BLEEDING is a common risk of cardiac surgery, with approximately 3.5% of patients requiring surgical re-exploration.1 Re-exploration is associated with adverse outcomes, including infections, ischemia, and increased 30-day mortality.2 Similar adverse outcomes are related to erythrocyte transfusions associated with cardiac surgery,3 in addition to the immunologic and administrative hazards of transfusion.4 These risks are important because the majority of patients undergoing cardiac surgery receive a blood transfusion despite the lack of evidence to support liberal transfusion strategies.5 The frequency and significance of bleeding after cardiac surgery warrant investigation of the hematologic changes throughout the procedure. This review focuses on the (patho)physiology of platelet-derived microvesicles in the setting of cardiovascular surgery, a developing area in the understanding of the control of coagulation.
1053-0770
222-228
Tempo, Jake
caa96ae0-68f1-468b-bce0-c75f0a424a6f
Englyst, Nicola A.
f84399af-7265-4224-b556-102c3aa272b0
Holloway, Judith A.
f22f45f3-6fc8-4a4c-bc6c-24add507037c
Smith, David C.
cc2ef49e-7c4a-4476-9ed0-18ec22976bf1
Tempo, Jake
caa96ae0-68f1-468b-bce0-c75f0a424a6f
Englyst, Nicola A.
f84399af-7265-4224-b556-102c3aa272b0
Holloway, Judith A.
f22f45f3-6fc8-4a4c-bc6c-24add507037c
Smith, David C.
cc2ef49e-7c4a-4476-9ed0-18ec22976bf1

Tempo, Jake, Englyst, Nicola A., Holloway, Judith A. and Smith, David C. (2016) Platelet microvesicles (microparticles) in cardiac surgery. Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia, 30 (1), 222-228. (doi:10.1053/j.jvca.2015.08.001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

SIGNIFICANT POSTOPERATIVE BLEEDING is a common risk of cardiac surgery, with approximately 3.5% of patients requiring surgical re-exploration.1 Re-exploration is associated with adverse outcomes, including infections, ischemia, and increased 30-day mortality.2 Similar adverse outcomes are related to erythrocyte transfusions associated with cardiac surgery,3 in addition to the immunologic and administrative hazards of transfusion.4 These risks are important because the majority of patients undergoing cardiac surgery receive a blood transfusion despite the lack of evidence to support liberal transfusion strategies.5 The frequency and significance of bleeding after cardiac surgery warrant investigation of the hematologic changes throughout the procedure. This review focuses on the (patho)physiology of platelet-derived microvesicles in the setting of cardiovascular surgery, a developing area in the understanding of the control of coagulation.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 10 August 2015
Published date: January 2016
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 383066
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383066
ISSN: 1053-0770
PURE UUID: cfbddbeb-1ae0-4260-bffe-d606190817e3
ORCID for Nicola A. Englyst: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0508-8323
ORCID for Judith A. Holloway: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2268-3071

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Oct 2015 14:17
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:55

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Author: Jake Tempo
Author: David C. Smith

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