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From laboratory research to a clinical trial: copper alloy surfaces kill bacteria and reduce hospital-acquired infections

From laboratory research to a clinical trial: copper alloy surfaces kill bacteria and reduce hospital-acquired infections
From laboratory research to a clinical trial: copper alloy surfaces kill bacteria and reduce hospital-acquired infections
OBJECTIVE:

This is a translational science article that discusses copper alloys as antimicrobial environmental surfaces. Bacteria die when they come in contact with copper alloys in laboratory tests. Components made of copper alloys were also found to be efficacious in a clinical trial.
BACKGROUND:

There are indications that bacteria found on frequently touched environmental surfaces play a role in infection transmission.
METHODS:

In laboratory testing, copper alloy samples were inoculated with bacteria. In clinical trials, the amount of live bacteria on the surfaces of hospital components made of copper alloys, as well as those made from standard materials, was measured. Finally, infection rates were tracked in the hospital rooms with the copper components and compared to those found in the rooms containing the standard components.
RESULTS:

Greater than a 99.9% reduction in live bacteria was realized in laboratory tests. In the clinical trials, an 83% reduction in bacteria was seen on the copper alloy components, when compared to the surfaces made from standard materials in the control rooms. Finally, the infection rates were found to be reduced by 58% in patient rooms with components made of copper, when compared to patients' rooms with components made of standard materials.
CONCLUSIONS:

Bacteria die on copper alloy surfaces in both the laboratory and the hospital rooms. Infection rates were lowered in those hospital rooms containing copper components. Thus, based on the presented information, the placement of copper alloy components, in the built environment, may have the potential to reduce not only hospital-acquired infections but also patient treatment costs.
64-79
Michels, H.T.
139d484d-fe23-4f66-a82a-8697413288df
Keevil, C.W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Salgado, C.S.
61db7732-55d5-4e99-a98b-40ec692cf98b
Schmidt, M.G.
2f1121c4-78c5-4bba-b796-26cb0d8e6c8f
Michels, H.T.
139d484d-fe23-4f66-a82a-8697413288df
Keevil, C.W.
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Salgado, C.S.
61db7732-55d5-4e99-a98b-40ec692cf98b
Schmidt, M.G.
2f1121c4-78c5-4bba-b796-26cb0d8e6c8f

Michels, H.T., Keevil, C.W., Salgado, C.S. and Schmidt, M.G. (2015) From laboratory research to a clinical trial: copper alloy surfaces kill bacteria and reduce hospital-acquired infections. Health Environments Research and Design Journal, 9 (1), 64-79. (doi:10.1177/1937586715592650). (PMID:26163568)

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This is a translational science article that discusses copper alloys as antimicrobial environmental surfaces. Bacteria die when they come in contact with copper alloys in laboratory tests. Components made of copper alloys were also found to be efficacious in a clinical trial.
BACKGROUND:

There are indications that bacteria found on frequently touched environmental surfaces play a role in infection transmission.
METHODS:

In laboratory testing, copper alloy samples were inoculated with bacteria. In clinical trials, the amount of live bacteria on the surfaces of hospital components made of copper alloys, as well as those made from standard materials, was measured. Finally, infection rates were tracked in the hospital rooms with the copper components and compared to those found in the rooms containing the standard components.
RESULTS:

Greater than a 99.9% reduction in live bacteria was realized in laboratory tests. In the clinical trials, an 83% reduction in bacteria was seen on the copper alloy components, when compared to the surfaces made from standard materials in the control rooms. Finally, the infection rates were found to be reduced by 58% in patient rooms with components made of copper, when compared to patients' rooms with components made of standard materials.
CONCLUSIONS:

Bacteria die on copper alloy surfaces in both the laboratory and the hospital rooms. Infection rates were lowered in those hospital rooms containing copper components. Thus, based on the presented information, the placement of copper alloy components, in the built environment, may have the potential to reduce not only hospital-acquired infections but also patient treatment costs.

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More information

Published date: 10 July 2015
Organisations: Biomedicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 383146
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383146
PURE UUID: 9a2ca19e-5479-4450-82b6-2169929b7c1e
ORCID for C.W. Keevil: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1917-7706

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Nov 2015 11:46
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:47

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Contributors

Author: H.T. Michels
Author: C.W. Keevil ORCID iD
Author: C.S. Salgado
Author: M.G. Schmidt

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