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Michael John Robert Fasham. 29 May 1942 — 7 June 2008

Michael John Robert Fasham. 29 May 1942 — 7 June 2008
Michael John Robert Fasham. 29 May 1942 — 7 June 2008
Professor Michael Fasham played a pioneering role in the development of marine ecosystem models for the study of nutrient and carbon cycling in the ocean. He is articularly celebrated for his famous Fasham–Ducklow–McKelvie model, which was the first of its kind to separate new and regenerated forms of nutrient, as well as including microbial recycling pathways. Fasham’s models provided key understanding of the links between primary production, carbon cycling and export (of organic matter from the surface to deep ocean) based on both deep and insightful parameterization inspired by his many collaborations with leading experimental and field biologists of the day, and by his expert use of data for model calibration and validation. He had the ability to see the big picture, linking observation and models to achieve a unified understanding of system dynamics. As well as the direct contributions of his own science, Fasham played a pivotal role in steering the international scientific agenda, notably his leadership of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study which had the aim of understanding ocean carbon cycling and sinks via the coordination of extensive field programmes, synthesis and modelling. He will be remembered by those who knew him for his openness, enthusiasm and modesty, a man who was fun to know and to work with and who loved the thrill of scientific adventure and discovery.
0080-4606
103-121
Anderson, Thomas R.
dfed062f-e747-48d3-b59e-2f5e57a8571d
Bryden, Harry L.
7f823946-34e8-48a3-8bd4-a72d2d749184
Anderson, Thomas R.
dfed062f-e747-48d3-b59e-2f5e57a8571d
Bryden, Harry L.
7f823946-34e8-48a3-8bd4-a72d2d749184

Anderson, Thomas R. and Bryden, Harry L. (2015) Michael John Robert Fasham. 29 May 1942 — 7 June 2008. Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society, 61, 103-121.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Professor Michael Fasham played a pioneering role in the development of marine ecosystem models for the study of nutrient and carbon cycling in the ocean. He is articularly celebrated for his famous Fasham–Ducklow–McKelvie model, which was the first of its kind to separate new and regenerated forms of nutrient, as well as including microbial recycling pathways. Fasham’s models provided key understanding of the links between primary production, carbon cycling and export (of organic matter from the surface to deep ocean) based on both deep and insightful parameterization inspired by his many collaborations with leading experimental and field biologists of the day, and by his expert use of data for model calibration and validation. He had the ability to see the big picture, linking observation and models to achieve a unified understanding of system dynamics. As well as the direct contributions of his own science, Fasham played a pivotal role in steering the international scientific agenda, notably his leadership of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study which had the aim of understanding ocean carbon cycling and sinks via the coordination of extensive field programmes, synthesis and modelling. He will be remembered by those who knew him for his openness, enthusiasm and modesty, a man who was fun to know and to work with and who loved the thrill of scientific adventure and discovery.

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More information

Published date: 1 December 2015
Organisations: Marine Systems Modelling

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 383200
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383200
ISSN: 0080-4606
PURE UUID: 875afdeb-6e61-43e6-a5cf-c7731f8b30a3
ORCID for Harry L. Bryden: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8216-6359

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Oct 2015 14:01
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:02

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