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Ambient oxygen concentrations resulting from use of the Lund University Cardiopulmonary Assist System (LUCAS) device during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation

Ambient oxygen concentrations resulting from use of the Lund University Cardiopulmonary Assist System (LUCAS) device during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation
Ambient oxygen concentrations resulting from use of the Lund University Cardiopulmonary Assist System (LUCAS) device during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation
Introduction

Supplementary oxygen is used routinely during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). High ambient oxygen levels from ventilation circuits have caused fatal fires and explosions. The Lund University Cardiopulmonary Assist System (LUCAS) device is driven by >70 l min?1 oxygen which is also likely to increase ambient oxygen concentrations and cause similar risk of fire and explosion. This study used simulated CPR with a LUCAS device to measure resulting ambient oxygen concentrations and assess safety of the device.

Material and methods

Simulated manikin CPR using a LUCAS device was performed outdoors, inside an ambulance (ventilation off and ventilation on full power), and in a resuscitation bay. Ambient oxygen concentrations were measured over the apical and sternal defibrillation sites and midway between the two, at the head and 1 m horizontally above the head. Recordings were made for 5 min when the LUCAS device was turned on and for a further 5 min when turned off.

Results

Ambient oxygen concentration increased quickly in all four scenarios. Peak oxygen levels over the chest were highest in the resuscitation bay (36.7%) and lowest in the ambulance with ventilation on full power (33.8%). Oxygen levels decreased to baseline within 5 min of turning off the LUCAS device.

Conclusion

The use of oxygen to drive the LUCAS device results in a rapid increase in ambient oxygen concentration to levels likely to risk injury or death from fire. Ambulance services and hospitals using the device must be alerted to these dangers immediately.
resuscitation, oxygen, LUCAS, fire, explosion, safety
0300-9572
303-309
Deakin, Charles D.
560d993b-bbc9-4548-9990-272ed18a011d
Paul, Vinu
efa98cdf-7257-4c77-95a8-102db696658e
Fall, Emma
9c9cf217-691d-4498-938d-f7f6365c58c3
Petley, Graham W.
4f2da40b-3c7b-4adc-b75c-e24e62bb1cf0
Thompson, Fizz
2b726656-8777-45ac-b6da-08941f62843b
Deakin, Charles D.
560d993b-bbc9-4548-9990-272ed18a011d
Paul, Vinu
efa98cdf-7257-4c77-95a8-102db696658e
Fall, Emma
9c9cf217-691d-4498-938d-f7f6365c58c3
Petley, Graham W.
4f2da40b-3c7b-4adc-b75c-e24e62bb1cf0
Thompson, Fizz
2b726656-8777-45ac-b6da-08941f62843b

Deakin, Charles D., Paul, Vinu, Fall, Emma, Petley, Graham W. and Thompson, Fizz (2007) Ambient oxygen concentrations resulting from use of the Lund University Cardiopulmonary Assist System (LUCAS) device during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Resuscitation, 74 (2), 303-309. (doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2007.04.001). (PMID:17507141)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction

Supplementary oxygen is used routinely during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). High ambient oxygen levels from ventilation circuits have caused fatal fires and explosions. The Lund University Cardiopulmonary Assist System (LUCAS) device is driven by >70 l min?1 oxygen which is also likely to increase ambient oxygen concentrations and cause similar risk of fire and explosion. This study used simulated CPR with a LUCAS device to measure resulting ambient oxygen concentrations and assess safety of the device.

Material and methods

Simulated manikin CPR using a LUCAS device was performed outdoors, inside an ambulance (ventilation off and ventilation on full power), and in a resuscitation bay. Ambient oxygen concentrations were measured over the apical and sternal defibrillation sites and midway between the two, at the head and 1 m horizontally above the head. Recordings were made for 5 min when the LUCAS device was turned on and for a further 5 min when turned off.

Results

Ambient oxygen concentration increased quickly in all four scenarios. Peak oxygen levels over the chest were highest in the resuscitation bay (36.7%) and lowest in the ambulance with ventilation on full power (33.8%). Oxygen levels decreased to baseline within 5 min of turning off the LUCAS device.

Conclusion

The use of oxygen to drive the LUCAS device results in a rapid increase in ambient oxygen concentration to levels likely to risk injury or death from fire. Ambulance services and hospitals using the device must be alerted to these dangers immediately.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: August 2007
Keywords: resuscitation, oxygen, LUCAS, fire, explosion, safety
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 383366
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383366
ISSN: 0300-9572
PURE UUID: a553dd79-d8f3-4050-b86b-603188472a10
ORCID for Graham W. Petley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3295-0444

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Nov 2015 13:08
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:53

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Contributors

Author: Vinu Paul
Author: Emma Fall
Author: Fizz Thompson

University divisions

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