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Defibrillation during renal dialysis: a survey of UK practice and procedural recommendations

Defibrillation during renal dialysis: a survey of UK practice and procedural recommendations
Defibrillation during renal dialysis: a survey of UK practice and procedural recommendations
Introduction

Defibrillation of patients connected to medical equipment that is not defibrillation proof risks ineffective defibrillation and harm to the operator as a result of aberrant electrical pathways taken by the defibrillation current. Many renal dialysis systems are not currently defibrillation proof. Although national and international safety standards caution against defibrillating under this circumstance, it appears to be an area of confusion that we have investigated in more detail.

Methods

Thirty renal dialysis units across the UK were invited to participate in a telephone survey of current practice from 1 October 2004 to 1 October 2005. The Medical Healthcare Regulatory Agency and renal dialysis machine manufacturers were contacted for advice, and current safety standards were reviewed.

Results

Twenty-eight renal dialysis units completed the survey. Seven (25%) units would not disconnect patients from dialysis equipment during defibrillation, collectively reporting 14 patients who had required defibrillation during dialysis. Eighteen (64.3%) units would disconnect patients from dialysis equipment during defibrillation, collectively reporting 29 patients who had required defibrillation during dialysis. No complications were identified by this survey, through the MHRA or through a literature search.

Conclusion

Defibrillation of patients while undergoing renal dialysis is common practice in the UK. Although no adverse events have been reported, this practice risks injury to the patient and clinical staff, and equipment damage if the dialysis equipment is not defibrillation proof. It is in breach of national and international safety standards and should not be practiced.
defibrillation, renal dialysis, risk assessment
0300-9572
347-353
Bird, Scott
fa0a4684-94bf-451e-8069-69f8204d291e
Petley, Graham W.
4f2da40b-3c7b-4adc-b75c-e24e62bb1cf0
Deakin, Charles D.
560d993b-bbc9-4548-9990-272ed18a011d
Clewlow, Frank
94c8568b-d5ea-4446-a712-4fa1560895c2
Bird, Scott
fa0a4684-94bf-451e-8069-69f8204d291e
Petley, Graham W.
4f2da40b-3c7b-4adc-b75c-e24e62bb1cf0
Deakin, Charles D.
560d993b-bbc9-4548-9990-272ed18a011d
Clewlow, Frank
94c8568b-d5ea-4446-a712-4fa1560895c2

Bird, Scott, Petley, Graham W., Deakin, Charles D. and Clewlow, Frank (2007) Defibrillation during renal dialysis: a survey of UK practice and procedural recommendations. Resuscitation, 73 (3), 347-353. (doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2006.10.012). (PMID:17291670)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction

Defibrillation of patients connected to medical equipment that is not defibrillation proof risks ineffective defibrillation and harm to the operator as a result of aberrant electrical pathways taken by the defibrillation current. Many renal dialysis systems are not currently defibrillation proof. Although national and international safety standards caution against defibrillating under this circumstance, it appears to be an area of confusion that we have investigated in more detail.

Methods

Thirty renal dialysis units across the UK were invited to participate in a telephone survey of current practice from 1 October 2004 to 1 October 2005. The Medical Healthcare Regulatory Agency and renal dialysis machine manufacturers were contacted for advice, and current safety standards were reviewed.

Results

Twenty-eight renal dialysis units completed the survey. Seven (25%) units would not disconnect patients from dialysis equipment during defibrillation, collectively reporting 14 patients who had required defibrillation during dialysis. Eighteen (64.3%) units would disconnect patients from dialysis equipment during defibrillation, collectively reporting 29 patients who had required defibrillation during dialysis. No complications were identified by this survey, through the MHRA or through a literature search.

Conclusion

Defibrillation of patients while undergoing renal dialysis is common practice in the UK. Although no adverse events have been reported, this practice risks injury to the patient and clinical staff, and equipment damage if the dialysis equipment is not defibrillation proof. It is in breach of national and international safety standards and should not be practiced.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: June 2007
Keywords: defibrillation, renal dialysis, risk assessment
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 383367
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383367
ISSN: 0300-9572
PURE UUID: 8deac4a3-1af1-48dc-8a85-191b04f426fb
ORCID for Graham W. Petley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3295-0444

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Nov 2015 13:13
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:59

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Contributors

Author: Scott Bird
Author: Frank Clewlow

University divisions

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