The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

An investigation of the diagnostic value of bilateral femoral neck bone mineral density measurements

An investigation of the diagnostic value of bilateral femoral neck bone mineral density measurements
An investigation of the diagnostic value of bilateral femoral neck bone mineral density measurements
This paper describes a study to assess the clinical value of bilateral femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) measurements. Although a range of factors will determine clinical decisions, the classification of the site with the lowest T-score is likely to have significant bearing on the management of a patient. While it is common practice to measure BMD at the lumbar spine and a single neck of femur, knowledge of the BMD of the second femur may also be of diagnostic value. Using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, BMD of the lumbar spine and right and left femoral neck was measured in a group of 2372 white, Caucasian women (mean age +/- SD, 56.6 +/- 13.9 years) routinely referred for bone densitometry. Analysis of the measurements showed a significant (p = 0.02) but small difference between the mean BMD of the right (0.840 +/- 0.152 g/cm2) and left (0.837 +/- 0.150 g/cm2) femoral neck. Further investigation of femur scans revealed 79 (3.3%) patients in whom one side was osteoporotic while the other side and spine were normal or osteopenic using the World Health Organization diagnostic criteria in combination with manufacturer's reference data. Patients in whom the femoral neck BMD measurements differed by less than the precision error of the system were then excluded. This left only 51 (2.2%) patients, that is 29 (1.2%) for right femur and spine scan and 22 (0.9%) for left femur and spine scan, in whom knowledge of both femoral neck BMD measurements could have altered the classification of the lowest site assessed to osteoporotic. These data suggest that there is only a small benefit from performing bilateral femoral neck BMD measurements. Since BMD measurements are only one of a range of factors considered as part of a patient's management, it is suggested that the extra time, cost and radiation dose associated with measurement of the second femur may not be justified.
0937-941X
675-679
Petley, G.W.
4f2da40b-3c7b-4adc-b75c-e24e62bb1cf0
Taylor, P.A.
9315d36c-6664-4d46-a422-f3d16ef4e7d5
Murrills, A.J.
4874f921-548f-4ac4-9195-34326e37e6cd
Dennison, E.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Pearson, G.
2206c4ec-f443-4db5-a83d-2ed2bb696034
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Petley, G.W.
4f2da40b-3c7b-4adc-b75c-e24e62bb1cf0
Taylor, P.A.
9315d36c-6664-4d46-a422-f3d16ef4e7d5
Murrills, A.J.
4874f921-548f-4ac4-9195-34326e37e6cd
Dennison, E.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Pearson, G.
2206c4ec-f443-4db5-a83d-2ed2bb696034
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6

Petley, G.W., Taylor, P.A., Murrills, A.J., Dennison, E., Pearson, G. and Cooper, C. (2000) An investigation of the diagnostic value of bilateral femoral neck bone mineral density measurements. Osteoporosis International, 11 (8), 675-679. (PMID:11095170)

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper describes a study to assess the clinical value of bilateral femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) measurements. Although a range of factors will determine clinical decisions, the classification of the site with the lowest T-score is likely to have significant bearing on the management of a patient. While it is common practice to measure BMD at the lumbar spine and a single neck of femur, knowledge of the BMD of the second femur may also be of diagnostic value. Using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, BMD of the lumbar spine and right and left femoral neck was measured in a group of 2372 white, Caucasian women (mean age +/- SD, 56.6 +/- 13.9 years) routinely referred for bone densitometry. Analysis of the measurements showed a significant (p = 0.02) but small difference between the mean BMD of the right (0.840 +/- 0.152 g/cm2) and left (0.837 +/- 0.150 g/cm2) femoral neck. Further investigation of femur scans revealed 79 (3.3%) patients in whom one side was osteoporotic while the other side and spine were normal or osteopenic using the World Health Organization diagnostic criteria in combination with manufacturer's reference data. Patients in whom the femoral neck BMD measurements differed by less than the precision error of the system were then excluded. This left only 51 (2.2%) patients, that is 29 (1.2%) for right femur and spine scan and 22 (0.9%) for left femur and spine scan, in whom knowledge of both femoral neck BMD measurements could have altered the classification of the lowest site assessed to osteoporotic. These data suggest that there is only a small benefit from performing bilateral femoral neck BMD measurements. Since BMD measurements are only one of a range of factors considered as part of a patient's management, it is suggested that the extra time, cost and radiation dose associated with measurement of the second femur may not be justified.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2000
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 383385
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383385
ISSN: 0937-941X
PURE UUID: 1802ebb9-9803-4542-a9d8-dea83643a916
ORCID for G.W. Petley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3295-0444
ORCID for E. Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Jan 2016 11:18
Last modified: 10 Jan 2019 01:37

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×