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Effects of changes in packed cell volume on the specific heat capacity of blood: implications for studies measuring heat exchange in extracorporeal circuits

Effects of changes in packed cell volume on the specific heat capacity of blood: implications for studies measuring heat exchange in extracorporeal circuits
Effects of changes in packed cell volume on the specific heat capacity of blood: implications for studies measuring heat exchange in extracorporeal circuits
Extracorporeal circuits such as cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and renal dialysis machines cause active and/or passive loss of body heat. Attempts to quantify this heat loss are generally based on the Fick principle which requires knowledge of the specific heat capacity (SHC) of blood. As changes in packed cell volume are common, we investigated the effect of these changes on the SHC of blood over a range of packed cell volumes (PCV) from whole blood at 43.1% (3594 J kg-1 degrees C-1) to pure Hartmann's solution (4153 J kg-1 degrees C-1). The SHC of other fluids used during CPB was also measured and found to be 4139 J kg-1 degrees C-1 and 4082 J kg-1 degrees C-1 for normal saline and Gelofusine, respectively. The maximum variability in SHC over the range of PCV values encountered during CPB was calculated to be small (5.5%). We conclude that use of a constant value of SHC for calculation of thermal energy transfer is currently justified.
0007-0912
28-32
Blake, A.S.
125b5558-1163-444e-8568-67113f6eeffd
Petley, G.W.
4f2da40b-3c7b-4adc-b75c-e24e62bb1cf0
Deakin, C.D.
560d993b-bbc9-4548-9990-272ed18a011d
Blake, A.S.
125b5558-1163-444e-8568-67113f6eeffd
Petley, G.W.
4f2da40b-3c7b-4adc-b75c-e24e62bb1cf0
Deakin, C.D.
560d993b-bbc9-4548-9990-272ed18a011d

Blake, A.S., Petley, G.W. and Deakin, C.D. (2000) Effects of changes in packed cell volume on the specific heat capacity of blood: implications for studies measuring heat exchange in extracorporeal circuits. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 84 (1), 28-32. (PMID:10740543)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Extracorporeal circuits such as cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and renal dialysis machines cause active and/or passive loss of body heat. Attempts to quantify this heat loss are generally based on the Fick principle which requires knowledge of the specific heat capacity (SHC) of blood. As changes in packed cell volume are common, we investigated the effect of these changes on the SHC of blood over a range of packed cell volumes (PCV) from whole blood at 43.1% (3594 J kg-1 degrees C-1) to pure Hartmann's solution (4153 J kg-1 degrees C-1). The SHC of other fluids used during CPB was also measured and found to be 4139 J kg-1 degrees C-1 and 4082 J kg-1 degrees C-1 for normal saline and Gelofusine, respectively. The maximum variability in SHC over the range of PCV values encountered during CPB was calculated to be small (5.5%). We conclude that use of a constant value of SHC for calculation of thermal energy transfer is currently justified.

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More information

Published date: January 2000
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 383386
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383386
ISSN: 0007-0912
PURE UUID: 683039d3-2016-449b-a489-ff1ac5b13595
ORCID for G.W. Petley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3295-0444

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jan 2016 14:47
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 01:12

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