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Studying public deliberation after the systemic turn: the crucial role for interpretive research

Studying public deliberation after the systemic turn: the crucial role for interpretive research
Studying public deliberation after the systemic turn: the crucial role for interpretive research
The recent shift towards a deliberative systems approach suggests understanding public deliberation as a communicative activity occurring in a diversity of spaces. While theoretically attractive, the deliberative systems approach raises a number of methodological questions for empirical social scientists. For example, how to identify multiple communicative sites within a deliberative system, how to study connections between different sites, and how to assess the impact of the broader context on deliberative forums and systems? Drawing on multiple case studies, this article argues that interpretive research methods are well-suited to studying the ambiguities, dynamics and politics of complex deliberative systems.
deliberative system, deliberative democracy, empirical, interpretive research
0305-5736
1-36
Ercan, Selen A.
22ae08a9-e6dd-4fdf-aeba-a980d53d945b
Hendriks, Carolyn M.
32fd452a-74d4-4600-8b72-db46637c249f
Boswell, John
34bad0df-3d4d-40ce-948f-65871e3d783c
Ercan, Selen A.
22ae08a9-e6dd-4fdf-aeba-a980d53d945b
Hendriks, Carolyn M.
32fd452a-74d4-4600-8b72-db46637c249f
Boswell, John
34bad0df-3d4d-40ce-948f-65871e3d783c

Ercan, Selen A., Hendriks, Carolyn M. and Boswell, John (2017) Studying public deliberation after the systemic turn: the crucial role for interpretive research. Policy & Politics, 1-36. (doi:10.1332/030557315X14502713105886).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The recent shift towards a deliberative systems approach suggests understanding public deliberation as a communicative activity occurring in a diversity of spaces. While theoretically attractive, the deliberative systems approach raises a number of methodological questions for empirical social scientists. For example, how to identify multiple communicative sites within a deliberative system, how to study connections between different sites, and how to assess the impact of the broader context on deliberative forums and systems? Drawing on multiple case studies, this article argues that interpretive research methods are well-suited to studying the ambiguities, dynamics and politics of complex deliberative systems.

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POLICYPOL-D-14-00098_R3.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 26 October 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 December 2015
Published date: 1 April 2017
Keywords: deliberative system, deliberative democracy, empirical, interpretive research
Organisations: Politics & International Relations

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 383506
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383506
ISSN: 0305-5736
PURE UUID: edb3808b-5745-4f1b-a918-582c0d0dde89
ORCID for John Boswell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3018-8791

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Nov 2015 11:05
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:01

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Contributors

Author: Selen A. Ercan
Author: Carolyn M. Hendriks
Author: John Boswell ORCID iD

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