The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Can systematic reviews inform GMO risk assessment and risk management?

Can systematic reviews inform GMO risk assessment and risk management?
Can systematic reviews inform GMO risk assessment and risk management?
Systematic reviews represent powerful tools to identify, collect, synthesize, and evaluate primary research data on specific research questions in a highly standardized and reproducible manner. They enable the defensible synthesis of outcomes by increasing precision and minimizing bias whilst ensuring transparency of the methods used. This makes them especially valuable to inform evidence-based risk analysis and decision making in various topics and research disciplines. Although seen as a “gold standard” for synthesizing primary research data, systematic reviews are not without limitations as they are often cost, labor and time intensive and the utility of synthesis outcomes depends upon the availability of sufficient and robust primary research data. In this paper, we (1) consider the added value systematic reviews could provide when synthesizing primary research data on genetically modified organisms (GMO) and (2) critically assess the adequacy and feasibility of systematic review for collating and analyzing data on potential impacts of GMOs in order to better inform specific steps within GMO risk assessment and risk management. The regulatory framework of the EU is used as an example, although the issues we discuss are likely to be more widely applicable.
GMO, bias, evidence synthesis, risk assessment, risk management, systematic review
1-12
Kohl, Christian
359eea10-072a-402e-82fb-72ef3d4a15d3
Frampton, Geoff
26c6163c-3428-45b8-b8b9-92091ff6c69f
Sweet, Jeremy
1c56d9c1-ac33-43a7-8de5-c5d98ca1cb0f
Spoek, Armin
c75cd4e5-34d3-4a5f-a5d4-4a1c7490940c
Haddaway, Neal
c4355594-1dda-4eed-b295-1dc6c83bc771
Wilhelm, Ralf Alexander
4254313c-9f8e-4950-a756-4c183937659f
Unger, Stefan
7394b3e9-af0c-495b-9f37-8bcdd979892e
Schiemann, Joachim Hermann
97ffcd80-f9db-4c60-9ab1-a18dfdd87509
Kohl, Christian
359eea10-072a-402e-82fb-72ef3d4a15d3
Frampton, Geoff
26c6163c-3428-45b8-b8b9-92091ff6c69f
Sweet, Jeremy
1c56d9c1-ac33-43a7-8de5-c5d98ca1cb0f
Spoek, Armin
c75cd4e5-34d3-4a5f-a5d4-4a1c7490940c
Haddaway, Neal
c4355594-1dda-4eed-b295-1dc6c83bc771
Wilhelm, Ralf Alexander
4254313c-9f8e-4950-a756-4c183937659f
Unger, Stefan
7394b3e9-af0c-495b-9f37-8bcdd979892e
Schiemann, Joachim Hermann
97ffcd80-f9db-4c60-9ab1-a18dfdd87509

Kohl, Christian, Frampton, Geoff, Sweet, Jeremy, Spoek, Armin, Haddaway, Neal, Wilhelm, Ralf Alexander, Unger, Stefan and Schiemann, Joachim Hermann (2015) Can systematic reviews inform GMO risk assessment and risk management? Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology, 3 (113), 1-12. (doi:10.3389/fbioe.2015.00113). (PMID:26322307)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Systematic reviews represent powerful tools to identify, collect, synthesize, and evaluate primary research data on specific research questions in a highly standardized and reproducible manner. They enable the defensible synthesis of outcomes by increasing precision and minimizing bias whilst ensuring transparency of the methods used. This makes them especially valuable to inform evidence-based risk analysis and decision making in various topics and research disciplines. Although seen as a “gold standard” for synthesizing primary research data, systematic reviews are not without limitations as they are often cost, labor and time intensive and the utility of synthesis outcomes depends upon the availability of sufficient and robust primary research data. In this paper, we (1) consider the added value systematic reviews could provide when synthesizing primary research data on genetically modified organisms (GMO) and (2) critically assess the adequacy and feasibility of systematic review for collating and analyzing data on potential impacts of GMOs in order to better inform specific steps within GMO risk assessment and risk management. The regulatory framework of the EU is used as an example, although the issues we discuss are likely to be more widely applicable.

Text
__soton.ac.uk_ude_personalfiles_users_gkf1_mydesktop_Front Bioeng Biotechnol 2015.pdf - Other
Download (170kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 July 2015
Published date: 12 August 2015
Keywords: GMO, bias, evidence synthesis, risk assessment, risk management, systematic review
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 383597
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/383597
PURE UUID: 42b175ad-87c6-4300-aa3c-425e14158836
ORCID for Geoff Frampton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2005-0497

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Nov 2015 10:49
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:41

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Christian Kohl
Author: Geoff Frampton ORCID iD
Author: Jeremy Sweet
Author: Armin Spoek
Author: Neal Haddaway
Author: Ralf Alexander Wilhelm
Author: Stefan Unger
Author: Joachim Hermann Schiemann

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×