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Characterization and recognition of deep-water channel-lobe transition zones

Characterization and recognition of deep-water channel-lobe transition zones
Characterization and recognition of deep-water channel-lobe transition zones
The channel-lobe transition zone (CLTZ) is an important, but commonly overlooked, element of many deep-water turbidite systems. Recognizing this zone is difficult in both modern and ancient environments and depends largely on the quality and resolution of the data obtained. In this article, three case studies of modern CLTZs are presented, largely based on high-resolution side-scan sonar imagery. These data are then compared to other well-defined CLTZs, both modern and ancient, and the common characteristics identified.

CLTZs occur at canyon/channel mouths and are commonly associated with a break of slope. Most sediment bypasses this zone, and consequently only coarse sands and gravels are deposited, although these are commonly patchily distributed and extensively reworked. The CLTZ is characterized by abundant erosional features, including isolated spoon- and chevron-shaped scours up to 20 m deep, 2 km wide, and 2.5 km long. In areas of more widespread erosion, these merge to form amalgamated scours several kilometers across. Depositional bed forms include sediment waves with wavelengths of 1-2 km and wave heights up to 4 m. The presence or absence of a CLTZ has important implications for hydrocarbon exploration and development, especially in terms of the connectivity between sandy channel-fill and lobe facies.
turbidites, side scan sonar, erosion features, deep water, sediments, agadir canyon, lisbon canyon, rhone fan, geology
0149-1423
1441-1462
Wynn, Russell B.
72ccd765-9240-45f8-9951-4552b497475a
Kenyon, Neil H.
fc3aeb3d-7211-4765-b767-b91692b52724
Stow, Dorrik A.V.
888764b3-5e4d-49bf-96fd-32ba7f6f8356
Masson, Douglas G.
edd44c8b-38ca-45fb-8d0d-ac8365748a45
Weaver, Philip P.E.
c063e3ea-7779-4a03-be52-c8b83e135bfb
Wynn, Russell B.
72ccd765-9240-45f8-9951-4552b497475a
Kenyon, Neil H.
fc3aeb3d-7211-4765-b767-b91692b52724
Stow, Dorrik A.V.
888764b3-5e4d-49bf-96fd-32ba7f6f8356
Masson, Douglas G.
edd44c8b-38ca-45fb-8d0d-ac8365748a45
Weaver, Philip P.E.
c063e3ea-7779-4a03-be52-c8b83e135bfb

Wynn, Russell B., Kenyon, Neil H., Stow, Dorrik A.V., Masson, Douglas G. and Weaver, Philip P.E. (2002) Characterization and recognition of deep-water channel-lobe transition zones. AAPG Bulletin, 86 (8), 1441-1462. (doi:10.1306/61EEDCC4-173E-11D7-8645000102C1865D).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The channel-lobe transition zone (CLTZ) is an important, but commonly overlooked, element of many deep-water turbidite systems. Recognizing this zone is difficult in both modern and ancient environments and depends largely on the quality and resolution of the data obtained. In this article, three case studies of modern CLTZs are presented, largely based on high-resolution side-scan sonar imagery. These data are then compared to other well-defined CLTZs, both modern and ancient, and the common characteristics identified.

CLTZs occur at canyon/channel mouths and are commonly associated with a break of slope. Most sediment bypasses this zone, and consequently only coarse sands and gravels are deposited, although these are commonly patchily distributed and extensively reworked. The CLTZ is characterized by abundant erosional features, including isolated spoon- and chevron-shaped scours up to 20 m deep, 2 km wide, and 2.5 km long. In areas of more widespread erosion, these merge to form amalgamated scours several kilometers across. Depositional bed forms include sediment waves with wavelengths of 1-2 km and wave heights up to 4 m. The presence or absence of a CLTZ has important implications for hydrocarbon exploration and development, especially in terms of the connectivity between sandy channel-fill and lobe facies.

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Published date: August 2002
Keywords: turbidites, side scan sonar, erosion features, deep water, sediments, agadir canyon, lisbon canyon, rhone fan, geology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 38368
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/38368
ISSN: 0149-1423
PURE UUID: a65e84a0-0595-49e7-a031-65d25670b90d

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Date deposited: 07 Jun 2006
Last modified: 19 Nov 2021 19:36

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Contributors

Author: Russell B. Wynn
Author: Neil H. Kenyon
Author: Dorrik A.V. Stow
Author: Douglas G. Masson
Author: Philip P.E. Weaver

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